Handsome, Travel-Friendly Surfboards From the Beats Design Team

Surfboards come in roughly three shapes: shortboards (“Pro surfers use them like skateboards, for doing tricks, getting air,” Rolandson says), longboards, for cruising, and gun boards, for taking on massive waves. The Octovo x Tilley boards have a shape that’s somewhere in the middle, so surfers can take them along different coastlines, in varying water conditions. Photos by Ammunition

Jason Tilley, the Oregon-based collaborator, actually specializes in custom sailboats, but he’d been working on a technique for building custom wooden boards. Photos by Ammunition

For its line of non-tech products, Ammunition, the design studio behind Beats by Dre and other products, teamed with an Oregon surfboard maker. Photos by Ammunition

“We talked about, what would a traveling surfer need?” he says. “We looked about some shapes about boards that could be utilized in several conditions.” Photos by Ammunition

The Octovo x Tilley starts at $3,000 a board and can be found here. Photos by Ammunition

Most boards have a foam core and fiberglass exterior; the combination is simultaneously lightweight and sturdy. Instead of fiberglass, Tilley’s boards have an exoskeleton of locally milled cedar, that’s layered on the foam core in sheets and then vacuum molded to fit. The result is more sumptuous, and according to Rolandson, stronger. Photos by Ammunition

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Surfboards come in roughly three shapes: shortboards (“Pro surfers use them like skateboards, for doing tricks, getting air,” Rolandson says), longboards, for cruising, and gun boards, for taking on massive waves. The Octovo x Tilley boards have a shape that’s somewhere in the middle, so surfers can take them along different coastlines, in varying water conditions. Photos by Ammunition

Jason Tilley, the Oregon-based collaborator, actually specializes in custom sailboats, but he’d been working on a technique for building custom wooden boards. Photos by Ammunition

For its line of non-tech products, Ammunition, the design studio behind Beats by Dre and other products, teamed with an Oregon surfboard maker. Photos by Ammunition

“We talked about, what would a traveling surfer need?” he says. “We looked about some shapes about boards that could be utilized in several conditions.” Photos by Ammunition

The Octovo x Tilley starts at $3,000 a board and can be found here. Photos by Ammunition

Most boards have a foam core and fiberglass exterior; the combination is simultaneously lightweight and sturdy. Instead of fiberglass, Tilley’s boards have an exoskeleton of locally milled cedar, that’s layered on the foam core in sheets and then vacuum molded to fit. The result is more sumptuous, and according to Rolandson, stronger. Photos by Ammunition

The design team at San Francisco-based Ammunition does work for companies with a heavy tech slant: Beats by Dre, Adobe, and Polaroid are all clients. As an antidote to all that hyper-connectivity, last year Ammunition launched Octovo: a spin-off line of travel goods meant to create an experience that, as Ammunition partner Matt Rolandson puts it, “is the complete opposite on the spectrum of checking Twitter.”

The thinking behind Octovo is simple: Our phones and tablets take us on virtual vacations every day, through screens. While actually traveling, however, we should be looking up, taking in our physical surroundings. We already have technology to help us stay wired; therefore, we should have other products that let us focus on our senses. The first Octovo goods were leather wallets and accessories. Now, they’ve partnered with Oregon-based Tilley Surfboards for a line of travel-friendly boards.

WS_Tilley-7

Ammunition

Rolandson met Jason Tilley years ago. Tilley, who lives in the coastal Oregon town of Port Orford, is trained in building custom wooden sailboats. His work dovetails philosophically with the Octovo brand. “Wooden sailboats are totally custom in this really intimate way, and they’re all about interacting with travel and the environment,” Rolandson says. Tilley is also a lifelong surfer, and had been working on a technique for building custom wooden surfboards. Most boards have a foam core and fiberglass exterior; the combination is simultaneously lightweight and sturdy. Instead of fiberglass, Tilley’s boards have an exoskeleton of locally milled cedar, that’s layered on the foam core in sheets and then vacuum molded to fit. The result is more sumptuous, and according to Rolandson, stronger.

“We talked about, what would a traveling surfer need?” he says. “We looked at some shapes that could be utilized in several conditions.” Surfboards come in roughly three shapes: shortboards (“Pro surfers use them like skateboards, for doing tricks, getting air,” Rolandson says), longboards, for cruising, and gun boards, for taking on massive waves. The Octovo x Tilley boards have a shape that’s somewhere in the middle, so surfers can take them along different coastlines, in varying water conditions. The Ammunition team also created five bags for each Octovo x Tilley board out of material that’s UV-proof and water resistant.

“The idea of how to directly, viscerally, connect with the world, rather than connect through technology—that’s really heady stuff,” Rolandson says. “But when I look at what Jason is doing, it becomes really clear in how he lives his life outside in the wilderness, and how he’s totally devoted to experiencing wilderness through surfboards.”

The Octovo x Tilley line starts at $3,000 a board, and can be found here.

Article source: http://www.wired.com/2014/06/a-handsome-line-of-travel-friendly-surfboards-from-the-beats-by-dre-design-team/

Celebrating 100 Years Of Intercity Bus Travel

Bus travel is a mode of transportation that many people may take for granted, but its role as an integral part of America’s infrastructure for the past century was commemorated earlier this month at the U.S. Department of Transportation headquarters in Washington.

“One hundred years ago, Carl Eric Wickman, a Swedish immigrant and drill operator laid-off from Minnesota’s iron ore mines, began a modest bus service to take miners from Hibbing to nearby Alice, a town known for its saloons,” Anne Ferro, administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, wrote on Fast Lane, the official blog of the Transportation Department, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Greyhound Bus Lines and the intercity motor coach coach industry.

“He charged 15 cents a ride in a Hupmobile. A year later, Wickman joined forces with a similar service running between Hibbing and Duluth. In its first year, the Mesaba Transportation Company earned an $8,000 profit, and American intercity bus travel was born. During the 1920s, Wickman’s buses –with their sleek lines and grey paint– become known as “greyhounds,” and in 1929 the company officially became Greyhound Lines.”

The government event was part of  Greyhound’s Centennial Tour, launched earlier this year, which will have visited nearly 40 cities across the United States by the end of the year. The tour features two buses converted into mobile museums with displays of memorabilia like signage, vintage driver uniforms, driver pins and badges, and a historic timeline wall with interactive touch screen displays. Guests can view videos of vintage ads, movie clips and other historic images.

Greyhound lays claim to being the first to introduce rear-mounted engines with its 1936 Supercoach “giving the driver better visibility of the road ahead, along with the first belly compartments for luggage.” And in the late 1930s, the company said, “Greyhound brought on-board air conditioning as a new feature, along with other passenger comforts such as washrooms and an air-suspension ride.”

Historic vehicles on display as part of the Centennial Tour include:

The Hupmobile, Greyhound's first bus

The Hupmobile, Greyhound’s first bus

The Hupmobile:  In 1914, it was the first Greyhound bus and was used to transport iron miners from Hibbing to Alice, Minn.

Greyhound's Mack Bus

Greyhound’s Mack Bus

The Mack Bus, built in 1931 by Mack Truck Company, included amenities such as mohair seats with horsehair stuffing and side curtains to keep out roadside dust and glaring sunlight.

And bus rides have become a significant part of our nation’s history, Ferro noted. “More than 50 years ago, motorcoaches carried Freedom Riders into the Deep South to challenge segregation. During World War II, motorcoaches carried soldiers from coast-to-coast.”

Consumers can learn about Greyhound’s tour schedule and bus history, and can access safety information about current carriers in operation using the government’s SaferBus app, a free tool.

 

 

Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/tanyamohn/2014/06/30/celebrating-100-years-of-intercity-bus-travel/

Car care tips for holiday travel

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Monday, June 30, 2014 | 4:46 p.m.

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Atlanta Bargain Hunter

Posted: 12:00 p.m. Monday, June 30, 2014


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By Nedra Rhone

Friday is July 4th and almost 35 million Americans will hit the highway, traveling at least 50 miles from their homes, according to AAA auto club. That is the highest number of road travelers since 2007.

Independence Day travel will run from Wed., July 2 to Sun., July 6. Much of the talk about holiday travel has focused on gas prices which are at the highest level of any July 4th weekend since 2008. High gas prices are not likely to reduce holiday travel, but you canreduce your fuel consumption with these five habits.

Before you hit the road, you will also want to get your car ready for the highway. Pam Oakes, car technician, shop owner and author of “Car Care for the Clueless,” suggests taking your car to an ASE certified technician for a quick check of the following: 

  1. Oil: If you’ll be doing lots of driving, get your oil changed. Be sure you know what brand and weight your car takes in case you have problems on the road. Have the technician write the information down for you and store it in your car manual.
  2. Antifreeze/coolant: This keeps the engine cool and keeps it from freezing over in the winter. While the fluid has nothing to do with your A/C, if your car overheats the A/C won’t work.
  3. Windshield wiper blades: Make sure you clean your blades before you travel or have them replaced if necessary. To clean them yourself, use a cleaner like 409 and paper towels.
  4. Transmission fluid, power steering fluid and brake fluid: Be sure the technician checks each of these fluids. Also have the condition of the brake pads on the front and back of the car checked. If you’ve had any issues with the brakes, be sure to ask about it.
  5. Battery: Have your car battery checked to be sure it is in top working condition and have any battery acid residue cleaned.
  6. Tire conditions: Get your tires checked for wear before you leave and check the tire pressure. While you’re on the road, get in the habit of checking your tires when you stop to pump gas. Turn your wheels away from pump and look at the tread, Oakes says. If it looks funny, have it checked out immediately. Also keep track of your tire pressure. The proper pressure can be found on the driver’s side door jamb sticker.
  7. Lights: Before you leave, pull the car in your driveway at dusk and check your turn signals, break lights, parking lights, headlights and horn to make sure all are in working order.
  8. Assemble an emergency kit in your car with the following items:
  • Snacks
  • Paper towels
  • First aid kit with bug spray included.
  • Painter’s tarp. If you get caught in the rain with broken windows, you can cover your car.
  • Duct tape for multiple uses including small repairs after a fender bender.
  • Tire puncture sealer to help you keep rolling if you run over a nail. It will get you from point A to point B, just let the tech know you used it before they repair your tire.
  • A spare car key in a hide-a-key container under the car can be a lifesaver when you’ve locked your keys in the car.
  • LED roadside flares.
  • Dryer sheets. Use these with water to get bugs off of your car and prolong the life of your paint.

Nedra Rhone

About Nedra Rhone

Nedra Rhone finds and shares tips on money, deals and consumer issues in metro Atlanta for the AJC.

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Holographic staff and no lost luggage: How you’ll travel in 2024

(CNN) — A driverless taxi is waiting for you outside your house. Cruising through the city, you arrive safely at the airport where you drop off your luggage while ordering a coffee. Check-in is then a matter of just a few seconds, thanks to facial recognition software, while distant biometric scanning allows you to avoid long security queues.

Walking past interactive shopping windows, yoga studios and outdoor green terraces, you arrive at the departure hall, a bright uplifting space dotted with paintings by the French impressionist masters. After having a look around, holographic airport staff guide you to your boarding gate. You soon find yourself aboard sitting in your body morphing seat that is fully-equipped with all the movies from your favorite director.

No, this is not science fiction. Instead, this is how your airport travel experience will be in just 10 years from now– according to Skyscanner.

The travel booking site released Monday the second part of its “Future of Travel” report which looks at what travel journeys will look like in 2024.

Compiled by a team of 56 experts and futurologists from the travel and tech industries, the study predicts that future travel journey “will be almost unrecognizable from the often time consuming and stressful experience of 2014.”

In 10 years’ time airports will be intelligent spaces that will allow travelers to enjoy an automated and stress free journey. Emerging technologies will transform airlines into virtual hubs where passengers will be able to create their own havens to suit their personal preferences.

“Airports and flights will no longer be the price we pay to travel but instead will signify the start of our holidays where travelers can relax and create the perfect space to suit their needs whether they’re flying for business or leisure,” says Filip Filipov, Skyscanner’s Head of B2B.

Here, based on Skyscanner’s predictions, CNN’s On The Move presents the top three things you can expect to experience at the airport and while flying in 2024.

1. Self-service check-in, scanning sensors and digital bag tags

Future travelers will take complete control of their journey, which will be free of check-in desks and long queues.

Biometric check-in software will eliminate the need for boarding passes and passport checks, while X-ray machines will also become a thing of the past thanks to sensors capable of scanning big groups from a large distance.

Digital luggage tags pre-set with flight details and destination information will allow passengers to track their bags in real time throughout their trip.

“You’d be able to see where your bag is at all time,” says Filipov, “and when it is arriving.”

2. Art, yoga and waterfalls

Once past security, out go the blunt and dull and in come the cool and splendor.

The soulless departure lounges and mundane transit areas of today will be replaced by uplifting, comfortable lounges filled with paintings and sculptures. If you don’t feel like delving into the world of art, amenities ranging from rooftop swimming pools and 3D cinemas to gyms and open-air parks will offer a pleasant distraction before boarding your flight.

Similarly, virtual shopping walls will replace duty free stores, with passengers able to order goods with a simple verbal command. “You will be able to select the goods that you’d like to buy and have them delivered to your home potentially when you’re back from vacation,” says Filipov.

3. ‘Your home in the air’

In cabin smart lighting will make jetlag a thing of the past, while seats that mold to the passengers’ body shape will come with pre-loaded films and music according to their tastes.

A mix between a mobile living room and a virtual office, the seating will also allow travelers to hold 3D chats with their family, friends or business contacts through Skype hologram systems.

“That seat will become your home, in a way, in the air,” says Filipov. “It will actually be tailored to you, not in terms of how it looks and how it feels but rather the multimedia that goes with it.”

Article source: http://wreg.com/2014/06/30/holographic-staff-and-no-lost-luggage-how-youll-travel-in-2024/

How Airbnb Could Finally Disrupt the Business Travel Market

This past March, desperate for a place to stay during the clamorous South by Southwest festival in Austin, TX, my colleague and I turned to a vacation rental. We needed a place in which to collaborate, hold meetings and spend our evenings, and though we paid dearly for it, we ended up booking a loft right across the street from the conference venue. It was a unique solution to a simple problem, and I have no doubt that we’ll look to the service again in the future.

Like many business travelers, I tend to shy away from booking vacation rentals while out on business. The product experience is varied and unreliable; it takes research and effort to find the right venue, arrange for keys and settle in. There is no return incentive; unlike a Marriott or a Starwood hotel, I don’t get points for staying and I can’t accrue valuable benefits that so many business travelers adore.

But business travel is an enormous market segment, and tapping into even a portion of the annual multi-billion industry could be a windfall for agencies like Airbnb. Indeed, Barb Delollis, the former hotel reporter for USA Today reports that AirBnB is cautiously exploring the market. “There is increasing interest for Airbnb for the corporate world,” Marc McCabe, a business development executive at Airbnb tells her. And Concur, a widespread corporate tool for expense and travel management just reported a small uptick in vacation rentals now surfacing on expense reports.

English: Rental cabins near the Great Smoky Mo...

Rental cabins near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Sevier County, Tennessee. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Still, if the vacation rental industry has grand plans for disrupting the hotel industry, they need to deliver at least some parity for the business traveler. One area that’s critical for many travelers is in the consistent delivery of product.

“Business travelers crave consistency more than anything else,” Chris McGinnis, the editor of TravelSkills and a frequent business traveler tells me. “They don’t want surprises.  They love Best Westerns or Courtyards because they know what they are going to get every time. The product may lack local color and experiential pleasures, but there’s little chance of disappointment. I’m not sure you can get that kind of consistency when staying at someone’s house.”

Airbnb counters this by pointing to the variety and depth of amenities that a vacation renter may experience.  In the profile from Ms. Delollis, Marc McCabe suggests that the ability to cook meals and do laundry on one’s own terms provides value to a business traveler. Indeed, in many cases the variety of offerings — from bedding to appointments — ranges into areas much nicer than a three or four star hotel. But the lack of regularity and comfort drives business travelers away. If vacation rentals could provide tiered, minimum quality standards for its series of independently own and run properties, it may start to sway some business travelers into its grasp.

Another way by which vacation rental agencies could woo business travelers is through a loyalty program. Current regular business travelers are attracted to elite status and the points that come with repeated hotel stays. They can use these points for later vacations, transfer them to airline miles or even share them with friends — all incentives towards coming back to the same brand and staying a few extra nights. Vacation rentals, conversely, stick to the outdated notion that travelers will never return — so no incentive is needed. Instead, they should look towards their massive networks of properties to drive further traffic, giving even a miniscule bonus for coming back to the site. And they can look further to partner operators such as airlines or even hotel chains to swap points, allowing travelers from other market segments to experience the vacation rental product.

Rental providers can also benefit through increased integration with corporate travel systems. Many current business travelers book travel through company portals or agents, limiting carriers and products that they can search. Once wide integration of rental properties is available through corporate portals — much like Hipmunk currently integrates hotel and vacation rental searches — more business travelers will be able to consider them.

Corporate-booked vacation rentals may get more difficult before they become mainstream though, as more travel managers examine their local policies and draw constraints around lodging. Just last week the University of California issued a statement forbidding the expense of vacation rentals on company travel — and then quickly reversed that decision, perhaps due to outcry. Cases like this will become more common as vacation rentals find their footing in the business travel market — but in the end, sites like Airbnb and VRBO have much to gain.

 

Article source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/grantmartin/2014/06/30/how-airbnb-could-finally-disrupt-the-business-travel-market/

Holiday travel is fast approaching

The Fourth of July holiday weekend is fast approaching and that means an influx of people will be on the roads, traveling to see family and friends.

Phyllis McClellan, senior adviser with Thunderbird Travel in Murphysboro, said there is more driving to destinations during the summer holiday than other forms of travel.

She said the amount of people driving could be a result of not wanting to be surrounded by crowds of people at an airport.

“A lot of traveling during this time is to a beach or a lake for the weekend,” McClellan said. “Flying over the weekend is much more expensive and more frustrating because there are so many people doing the same thing.”

McClellan said while families are on a road trip, there are tips to remember especially when traveling with children.

“Make sure you have something for the young children to do, especially if going long distances,” she said. “A DVD player, coloring book or even a notebook and pencil could go a long way in keeping them occupied.”

She also said to make sure to update the GPS before leaving to be sure travelers have the most up-to-date information.

McClellan offered other tips, such as planning stops before leaving, not to over pack and to make sure to wash hands often when stopping at a rest area or restaurant.

She said she recommends travelers to use roadtrippers.com, a website that will tell a family what attractions, restaurants, hotels and more are ahead of them via application downloaded to a smartphone.

“It tells you where you are going and what is in the area,” McClellan said.

She said the best advice she can give to travelers is not to let something small ruin the whole trip.

“Above all, be flexible,” she said.

Gas prices over the holiday weekend are not likely to increase, which is good news to families making a trip, said Patrick Dehann, senior petroleum analyst with gasbuddy.com.

He said it is a common myth among travelers that gas prices will always increase during the holidays.

“Last year at the Fourth of July, gas prices in Illinois were actually below the national average,” Dehann said. “It is just like any other day of the year, meaning prices could go up or down.”

“There is no guarantee of what gas prices will do around the holidays.”

He said gas prices this year will likely remain steady or may even decrease by a couple of cents this week and into the holiday weekend.

“It doesn’t appear there is an upward trend of the area,” Dehann said.

Article source: http://thesouthern.com/news/local/holiday-travel-is-fast-approaching/article_49e05405-94d1-56b0-9096-f9b7852e0737.html?comment_form=true

PTI Airport Launches Campaign to Boost Travel

GREENSBORO—Travel season is in full swing and that means many people are looking for the best deals on flights.

Officials at the Piedmont Triad International Airport are hoping to attract some of those travelers. With the Fourth of July holiday approaching, it is a big week for travel.

Passenger travel at PTI remained flat in May after an increase in April. Airport officials have been working on several campaigns to boost travel.

One effort that is highlighted is the Fly Easy campaign. Airport representatives said the airport is easier to get through than RDU International Airport or Charlotte-Douglas International Airport. And the prices are still competitive.

PTI Airport has spent millions of dollars over the past couple years revamping its terminals, adding free Wi-Fi, device charging stations, new flight displays more seating and more destinations.

“We have new flights into LaGuardia Airport on the new American Airlines that started up about a month or two months ago that provides our passengers with an extra option to get to New York City. LaGuardia is our big destination airport, Frontier Airlines has also returned with its service to Denver,” said Kevin Baker, Executive Director of Piedmont Triad International.

Airport officials said it is hard to pin-point why travel was flat in May, but that it could just be the nature of travel.

Another factor that affects travel is the number of weekends in a month.

Article source: http://charlotte.twcnews.com/content/news/709299/pti-airport-launches-campaign-to-boost-travel/

Mountain West holiday travel projected to rise 1.5 percent

More than 3 million residents of the Mountain West region are expected to board planes, trains and automobiles during the Fourth of July weekend, the AAA reports.

That is a 1.5 percent hike over travel volumes during the same holiday period in 2013 for the region that includes Utah, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada and Arizona, according to AAA spokeswoman Rolayne Fairclough.


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AAA no longer breaks out its travel projections for states individually, but Fairclough said Utah travelers share the region’s “consumer confidence and steady economic improvement” — prime factors in the expected travel increase this year.

AAA projects 2.4 million Mountain West residents will drive to reach their holiday destinations, up half a percentage point from 2013. Air travel will increase by six-tenths of a percent with more than 317,000 travelers boarding planes. Another 273,000 plan to travel by rail, bus and watercraft, a 1.3 percent boost for that category.

Nationally, more than 41 million people will travel 50 miles or more during the Fourth of July holiday weekend, representing a 1.9 percent increase compared to last year.

remims@sltrib.com

Twitter: @remims



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Article source: http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/news/58132131-78/travel-percent-aaa-holiday.html.csp