Hurricane Sandy Gas Shortage Compounds Travel Problems In New York, New …

* Long lines at gas stations as fuel stations run dry
* Those that are open may start running out within 24 hours
* First day of commuting for many without mass transit
By David Sheppard
NEW YORK Oct 31 (Reuters) – More than half of all service stations in the New York City area and New Jersey were shut on Wednesday due to power outages and depleted fuel supplies, frustrating attempts to restore normal life in the wake of powerful storm Sandy, industry officials said.
Reports of long lines, dark stations and empty tanks circulated across the region on Wednesday, with some station owners unable to pump fuel due to a lack of power, while others quickly ran their tanks dry because of intensified demand and logistical problems in delivering fresh supplies.
The lack of working gas stations is likely to compound travel problems in the region, with the New York subway system expected to be out of action for several days and overland rail and bus services severely disrupted.
In New York, gas stations on Long Island and Staten Island also reported shortages, while lengthy lines were seen in Queens.
In New Jersey, where half of all businesses and homes were still without power, more than 80 percent of filling stations are unable to sell gasoline, said Sal Risalvato, head of the New Jersey Gasoline, Convenience, Automotive Association (NJGCA).
“It’s going to be an ugly few days until we can see both power and supplies restored,” he said by telephone.
The problem is not a lack of gasoline in the Northeast, but widespread power outages and the logistical problems created by the storm that are making it difficult to get fuel from refineries and terminals to those who need it.
Kevin Beyer, president of the Long Island Gasoline Retailers Association in Smithtown, New York, estimated that less than half of all gas stations were able to sell fuel on Wednesday morning.
“I have gas in the ground but no power. For many others they’re facing the opposite problem, with power but no gasoline. For the few stations that are lucky enough to have both they’ve got huge lines out front,” Beyer said.
“With the kind of demand they’re seeing they’re likely to run out of gasoline within the next 24 hours.”
Beyer estimated it could take until the end of next week to get all fuel stations operating again.
Four of the region’s six oil refineries were back to full production or increasing run rates on Wednesday, but the second-largest – the Bayway plant in New Jersey – was still idle after flooding damage that traders fear could delay its return to full service. Key import terminals were also still shut.
Power is slowly being restored to the affected regions. The Department of Energy said on Wednesday that 51 percent of homes and businesses in New Jersey were still without power. That is down, however, from around 65 percent on Tuesday afternoon. (Additional reporting by Robert Gibbons in New York; Editing by Claudia Parsons)

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  • Brooklyn, N.Y.

    Pedestrians look over a fence at a pile of boats flooded inland at the Varuna Boat Club on Oct. 31, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.

  • Queens, N.Y.

    People walk by a destroyed section of the Rockaway boardwalk in the heavily damaged Rockaway section of Queens after the historic boardwalk was washed away during Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 31, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. With the death toll currently at 55 and millions of homes and businesses without power, the US east coast is attempting to recover from the affects of floods, fires and power outages brought on by Hurricane Sandy. JFK airport in New York and Newark airport in New Jersey expect to resume flights on Wednesday morning and the New York Stock Exchange commenced trading after being closed for two days.

  • Queens, N.Y.

    Damage is viewed in the Rockaway neighborhood where the historic boardwalk was washed away during Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 31, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. With the death toll currently at 55 and millions of homes and businesses without power, the US east coast is attempting to recover from the affects of floods, fires and power outages brought on by Hurricane Sandy. JFK airport in New York and Newark airport in New Jersey expect to resume flights on Wednesday morning and the New York Stock Exchange commenced trading after being closed for two days.

  • Atlantic City, N.J.

    A damaged car is shown in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Atlantic City, N.J. Sandy was being blamed for at least six deaths across the state plus power outages that at their peak Monday affected 2.7 million residential and commercial customers.

  • Brooklyn, N.Y.

    A worker picks up debris outside of the damaged Tatiana Grill on the Brighton Beach boardwalk, on Oct. 31, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.

  • Atlantic City, N.J.

    A man walks down a street as workers clear debris from superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., on Oct. 31, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.

  • Brooklyn Bridge, N.Y.

    Commuters cross New York’s Brooklyn Bridge, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. The floodwaters that poured into New York’s deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city’s recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system’s 108-year history.

  • Babylon Village, N.Y

    Bill Schmith, right, gets help from his son-in-law Jeff Aiello as he works to salvage belongings from his heavily damaged home in Babylon Village, N.Y., in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (Jason DeCrow, AP)

  • Atlantic City, N.J.

    A worker uses a backhoe to move sand near a boardwalk that was destroyed by superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.

  • Queens, N.Y.

    Damage is viewed in the Rockaway neighborhood where the historic boardwalk was washed away during Hurricane Sandy on Oct.31, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. With the death toll currently at 55 and millions of homes and businesses without power, the US east coast is attempting to recover from the affects of floods, fires and power outages brought on by Hurricane Sandy. JFK airport in New York and Newark airport in New Jersey expect to resume flights on Wednesday morning and the New York Stock Exchange commenced trading after being closed for two days.

  • Queens, N.Y.

    An abandoned police car is viewed on the heavily damaged beach in the Rockaway section of Brooklyn are all that remain after the historic boardwalk was washed away during Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 31, 2012 in the Queens borough of New York City. With the death toll currently at 55 and millions of homes and businesses without power, the US east coast is attempting to recover from the affects of floods, fires and power outages brought on by Hurricane Sandy. JFK airport in New York and Newark airport in New Jersey expect to resume flights on Wednesday morning and the New York Stock Exchange commenced trading after being closed for two days.

  • New York Stock Exchange

    Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Stocks advanced as U.S. equity markets resumed trading for the first time this week after Hurricane Sandy.

  • New York Stock Exchange

    Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, on Oct. 31, 2012. Traffic is snarled, subways out of commission, streets flooded and power out in many parts of the city, but the New York Stock Exchange opened without hitch Wednesday after an historic two-day shutdown, courtesy of superstorm Sandy.

  • Hoboken, N.J.

    People line up to buy supplies at an Ace Hardware running a power generator October 31, 2012 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy which made landfall along the New Jersey shore, has left parts of the state and the surrounding area flooded and without power.

  • Hoboken, N.J.

    Blaine Badick and her fiancee Andrew Grapsas cross a flooded street with their dog while leaving their home Oct. 31, 2012 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy which made landfall along the New Jersey shore, has left parts of the state and the surrounding area flooded and without power.

  • Hoboken, N.J.

    Members of the National Guard stand ready with large trucks used to pluck people from high water in Hoboken, N.J. on Oct. 31, 2012 in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Parts of the city are still covered in standing water, trapping some residents in their homes. (Craig Ruttle, AP)

  • Staten Island, N.Y.

    Members of the Fire Department of New York (FDNY) search for stranded residents as they navigate through flood waters on Hylan Boulevard in the Staten Island borough of New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. New York City officials spent the day grappling with the damage from Sandy, the Atlantic superstorm that killed 10 people, sparked a fire that destroyed 111 homes in Queens, flooded tunnels of the biggest U.S. transit system and left more than 750,000 customers without power.

  • Edison, N.J.

    People wait in line to fill containers with fuel at a Shell gas station Oct. 30, 2012 in Edison, New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy which hit New York and New Jersey left much of Bergen County flooded and without power.

  • East Village, New York City

    People gather inside Dorian Gray Tap and Grill during a power outage following Hurricane Sandy, Oct. 30, 2012 in the East Village neighborhood of New York City. The storm has claimed at least 40 lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding accross much of the Atlantic seaboard leaving millions of people without power. US President Barack Obama has declared the situation a ‘major disaster’ for large areas of the US East Coast including New York City.

  • New York City

    Clouds hang over the darkened lower Manhattan skyline at night in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. New York City officials spent the day grappling with the damage from Sandy, the Atlantic superstorm that killed 10 people, sparked a fire that destroyed 111 homes in Queens, flooded tunnels of the biggest U.S. transit system and left more than 750,000 customers without power.

  • Hoboken, N.J.

    The twisted remains of a Hudson River marina are seen across from New York City as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ.

  • Hoboken, N.J.

    A resident walks through flood water and past a stalled ambulance in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ.

  • Hoboken, NJ.

    Cars sit in flood water as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ.

  • Hoboken, N.J.

    A yacht washes up on the waterfront of the Hudson River as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ.

  • Chesapeake Beach, MD

    A downed tree and power lines block Rt. 261 in Calvert County just south of Chesapeake Beach on Tuesday morning in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, in Chesapeake Beach, MD, on Oct. 30, 2012.

  • Reagan National Airport

    A lone arriving passenger walks onto the Reagan National Airport Metro platform just after Metro reopened the system this after noon after Hurricane Sandy in Arlington VA, Oct. 30, 2012.

  • People in New York’s Tribeca neighborhood, without power because of superstorm Sandy, wait for a chance to charge their mobile phones on an available generator setup on a sidewalk, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

  • People take photos at water filling the Bowling Green subway station in Battery Park in New York on October 30, 2012 as New Yorkers cope with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. The storm left large parts of New York City without power and transportation. TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

  • North Carolina 12 is buckled from pounding surf leading into Mirlo Beach in Rodanthe, N.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. People on North Carolina’s Outer Banks are facing some flooding and damage from Hurricane Sandy, but emergency management officials say it could have been worse. North Carolina Transportation Department spokeswoman Greer Beaty said the highway was closed Tuesday until crews inspect the road. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)

  • Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after they were destroyed when a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the East Coast on Monday night. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • FARMINGDALE, NY – OCTOBER 30: Timothy Henggeler, Logistics Specialist with FEMA speaks with New York guard members at Republic Airport in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Farmingdale, New York. The storm has claimed at least a few dozen lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding across much of the Atlantic seaboard. U.S. President Barack Obama has declared the situation a ‘major disaster’ for large areas of the U.S. east coast, including New York City. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

  • Breezy Point, N.Y.

    A firefighter works to contain a fire that destroyed over 50 homes during Hurricane Sandy on Oct. 30, 2012 in the Breezy Point neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York. At least 33 people were reported killed in the United States by Sandy as millions of people in the eastern United States have awoken to widespread power outages, flooded homes and downed trees. New York City was hit especially hard with wide spread power outages and significant flooding in parts of the city. (Spencer Platt, Getty Images)

  • Pleasure boats pile up 30 yards or more from the water’s edge in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the Cliffwood Beach section of Aberdeen, N.J. The storm’s high winds and the high astronomical tide paired up to rip the boats away from their dock and deposit them on shore. (AP Photo/Peter Hermann, III)

  • A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)

  • East Coast Begins To Clean Up And Assess Damage From Hurricane Sandy

    OCEAN CITY, NJ – OCTOBER 30: Residents survey the damage after Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Ocean City, New Jersey. Sandy made landfall last night on the New Jersey coastline bringing heavy winds and record floodwaters. At least two dozen people were reported killed in the United States as millions of people in the eastern United States are experiencing widespread power outages, flooded homes and downed trees. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

  • Jason Locke sweeps water and mud from his parents’ home in Westport, Mass., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Many homeowners who suffered losses because of flooding from Hurricane Sandy are likely to find themselves out of luck. Standard homeowners policies don’t cover flooding damage, and the vast majority of homeowners don’t have flood insurance.Yet it’s likely that many Northeasterners will purchase it in coming months, hoping they’ll be covered the next time around, at a cost averaging around $600 a year. (AP Photo/The Standard Times, Peter Pereira)

  • The tailend of a SUV is perched on top of a postal mailbox in the aftermath of floods from Hurricane Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Coney Island, N.Y. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • HUNTINGTON, NY – OCTOBER 30: Power lines rest at a 45 degree angle on Clinton Avenue in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Huntington, New York. The storm has claimed at least a few dozen lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding across much of the Atlantic seaboard. U.S. President Barack Obama has declared the situation a ‘major disaster’ for large areas of the U.S. east coast, including New York City. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

  • A flood damaged vehicle is surrounded by debris in Mirlo Beach in Rodanthe, N.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. People on North Carolina’s Outer Banks are facing some flooding and damage from Hurricane Sandy, but emergency management officials say it could have been worse. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)

  • A police officer watch as a passerby look into a store through a damaged security grate, in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, on Mermaid Avenue in Coney Island, N.Y. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.(AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

  • HUNTINGTON STATION, NY – OCTOBER 30: A sporting goods and camping store displays it’s message to residents in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Huntington Station, New York. The storm has claimed at least a few dozen lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding across much of the Atlantic seaboard. U.S. President Barack Obama has declared the situation a ‘major disaster’ for large areas of the U.S. east coast, including New York City. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

  • Nicholas Rodriguez looks over a section of the destroyed boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, not far from where a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall the night before. Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without electricity, but the full extent of the damage in New Jersey, where the storm roared ashore Monday night with hurricane force, was unclear. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

  • People walk on North Carolina 12 away from the buckling of the highway, pounded by surf, leading into Mirlo Beach in Rodanthe, N.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. People on North Carolina’s Outer Banks are facing some flooding and damage from Hurricane Sandy, but emergency management officials say it could have been worse. North Carolina Transportation Department spokeswoman Greer Beaty said the highway was closed Tuesday until crews inspect the road. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)

  • A huge tree split apart and fell over the front yard and fence of a home on Carpenter Avenue in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on Tuesday, Oct., 30, 2012, in Sea Cliff, N.Y. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)

  • Little Ferry, N.J.

    Olivia Loesner, 16, hugs her uncle, Little Ferry Deputy Fire Chief John Ruff, after she was brought from her flooded home in a boat in Little Ferry, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. At right carrying pets, is her mother, Janice Loesner. (Craig Ruttle, AP)

  • Ocean City, M.D.

    A National Guard humvee travels through high water to check the area after the effects of Hurricane Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (Alex Brandon, AP)

  • Cleveland, Ohio

    Waves pound a lighthouse on the shores of Lake Erie Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, near Cleveland. High winds spinning off the edge of superstorm Sandy took a vicious swipe at northeast Ohio early Tuesday, uprooting trees, cutting power to hundreds of thousands, closing schools and flooding parts of major commuter arteries that run along Lake Erie. (Tony Dejak, AP)

  • OCEAN CITY, NJ – OCTOBER 30: Streets remain flooded after Hurricane Sandy on October 30, 2012 in Ocean City, New Jersey. Sandy made landfall last night on the New Jersey coastline bringing heavy winds and record floodwaters. At least two dozen people were reported killed in the United States as millions of people in the eastern United States are experiencing widespread power outages, flooded homes and downed trees. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

  • A log rests on a vehicle damaged by superstorm Sandy at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

  • OCEAN CITY, MD – OCTOBER 30: People participate in metal detecting at the beach after Hurricane Sandy hit the region October 30, 2012 in Ocean City, Maryland. The storm has claimed at least 33 lives in the United States, and has caused massive flooding across much of the Atlantic seaboard. U.S. President Barack Obama has declared the situation a ‘major disaster’ for large areas of the U.S. east coast, including New York City, with widespread power outages and significant flooding in parts of the city. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

Article source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/10/31/hurricane-sandy-gas-shortage_n_2049986.html

Overcome Excuses for Why You Can’t Afford to Travel


Neal Frankle

Neal Frankle

Are you frustrated because you love to travel but don’t have the scratch you need to get out there? Lots of people I know share that problem. The good news is there are three easy solutions you can put in place fast to turn your hesitation around.

Before we jump in, let me share a quick story about two people who really took travel seriously, as I think it may motivate you. Lynne and Tim, a retired couple, traded their house key for a backpack and have been on the road a few years now. Lynne even wrote an article published in the Wall Street Journal about her adventures. The couple epitomizes the solutions we’re about to discuss. You may not want to be a full-time vagabond, but you can use the same solutions to hit the road and have a better time while doing so.

Your Spending Plan. When you talk about being able to travel, you can’t ignore the cost. This may sound counterintuitive but the longer your trips are, the lower your daily cost will be. Often the difference is dramatic. That’s because when you travel for longer periods of time, it’s easier to find inexpensive lodging and dining solutions.

If possible, try to arrange trips that last at least three weeks or longer and have a “home base” that will allow you to branch out and make side trips. Your home base should have some type of kitchen facilities, since there is nothing more expensive than dining out. Such lodgings are significantly less expensive per day than pricy hotels. Chances are you won’t be in the center of the action, but so what? The money you’ll save more than makes up for the inexpensive train or bus fair to town.

Check out sites like www.vrbo.com and www.homeaway.com for inexpensive vacation rentals.

Your Savings Plan. Now that you have squeezed out every bit of travel cost possible, it’s time to set up your budget. You know how much money you are going to spend and possibly when you want to spend it. Let’s assume you calculate that you need $5,000 for your trip and you want to travel in 10 months.

Guess how much money you need to save each month? $500. There are many ways you can accumulate that money. The easiest way to achieve your goal is to go through your spending with a fine-tooth comb. Can you squeeze $500 out of your spending every month? If so, set up a travel bank account and have that money automatically deposited into the account.

If you can’t find $500 in cuts, line up as many cuts as possible. You can make up the difference by either delaying your trip (to give yourself more time to save) or finding a way to bring more money each month with a part-time or weekend job.

I’m against the idea of raiding your savings to fund travel. You set up those savings accounts for a reason. Travel doesn’t qualify as an emergency, so don’t think about dipping into your emergency fund. Don’t cheat yourself by taking the easy route. Cut your travel costs and then cut your spending or earn a bit more in order to accumulate your required amount.

But what if you can’t find the savings you need in spending cuts or side jobs?

Your Priorities Plan. If you’ve taken the steps I’ve outlined above and still don’t have enough money to go, it means you should not travel because it’s not your priority.

Granted, there are people who won’t accept this. They simply don’t have the money to travel. They aren’t willing to do what is necessary to come up with the money. And yet they travel anyway. They either bust into their savings or investment accounts or rack up credit-card debt. Both of these options can lead to financial consequences. Once you start finding excuses to stick your fingers into the cookie jar, it’s hard to put the lid back on.

Your solution here is to re-evaluate your priorities. If you really want to travel, I’m all for it. Just make sure you cut your travel costs and accumulate the money you need to travel before you shit the road.

How do you fund your travel? Have you found other ways to cut costs?

Neal Frankle is a Certified Financial Planner and blogger at www.WealthPilgrim.com. One of the most detailed posts he has written was his review of the online bank Perkstreet.

Article source: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/my-money/2012/10/31/overcome-excuses-for-why-you-cant-afford-to-travel

Superstorm Sandy brings trouble to metro Detroit

The nation’s air transport system creaked back to life today after superstorm Sandy. Metro Detroit escaped the worst of superstorm Sandy’s effects, but it still left thousands without power in southeast Michigan, churned up powerful waves on the Great Lakes and caused havoc for many trying to fly into and out of Detroit. The effects of the unusually powerful late October storm could continue to be felt for days.

Power

About 40,000 DTE Energy customers remain without power today as crews work to repair damage.

The largest outages includes 10,000 customers in St. Clair County, DTE Energy spokesman John Austerberry said today. Oakland County has 6,000 customers out; 4,000 are without power in Wayne County, and Macomb County has 2,000 customers out. The rest are scattered across the region.

“We are still on track to get 90% of the customers who lost power restored by the end of the day,” Austerberry said. “I think by Thursday, we will be largely done. What will remain will be smaller outages.”

The company has requested additional crews from electric companies further west, he added. Before Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast, the company allowed 100 contract workers to head east to help.

“As you can imagine, with 7 million customers without power along the Atlantic Coast, a lot of resources are being directed there,” he said.

He said no regular DTE crews have been released because they are addressing the outages here.

“It’s a struggle out there,” he said.

Weather/lakes

A high temperature of 45 degrees is expected in metro Detroit today with a 60% chance of rain but lighter winds, said National Weather Service meteorologist Steve Considine. AccuWeather, the weather report of the Free Press, said it will get up to 49. Metro Detroit saw wind, rain, snow and sleet as the effects of Sandy swirled across southeast Michigan on Tuesday. Wind gusts were 40-50 m.p.h., according to the National Weather Service.

Wave heights reached nearly 30 feet in Lake Huron, Considine said.

Travel

Detroit Metro Airport has 47 departures and arrivals canceled so far for today, including all flights to and from Newark and the still-shuttered New York LaGuardia airport.

New York’s JFK airport, which opened on a limited basis this morning, has flights scheduled this afternoon to Detroit – but travelers should reconfirm flights before heading out.

Nationwide, 2,658 flights have been canceled today, according to FlightStats.com, which tracks air operations. That is a lot – but far less than the 7,000 canceled each of the last two days.

It could be the weekend before all those displaced and delayed by the storm Sandy get where they need to go. The nation’s airlines run such lean operations that there are no spare planes or crews available to transport delayed passengers.

Until then, many Michiganders are stuck in New York, and New Yorkers are stuck in Michigan.

Article source: http://www.freep.com/article/20121031/NEWS05/310310100/Superstorm-Sandy-brings-trouble-to-metro-Detroit

Travel Brochure Finds: The Best Key Lime Pie And More From Florida

Travel Brochures
Travel brochures found at any given destination compete for our attention. Local tour operators want us to choose them over others. Convention and visitors bureaus work to highlight all their city has to offer. Florida, the land of theme parks, beaches and year-round sun is no exception.

Racks of colorful point-of-travel brochures can be found in airports, at hotels, highway rest stops and just about any other place that travelers are likely to gather. On a road trip from Orlando to Miami, we stopped at turnpike rest areas along the way and picked up some of the travel brochures that crowds of visitors seemed most interested in.

travel brochuresKissimmee, Florida is home to must-see theme parks Walt Disney World Resort, Seaworld and Universal Studio’s Orlando Resort. From world-class resorts to RV campgrounds, Kissimmee offers a variety of choices for any age or interest.

Special events held throughout the year range from June’s Silver Spurs Rodeo to the Osborne Family Spectacle of Lights coming up November 3 at Disney’s Hollywood Studios, running through January 3.


travel brochuresKey West, Florida calls itself America’s Island Paradise for a number of reasons. Walking tours are a good way to see some of the island’s best attractions but trolley tours are also popular.

The Key West City Cemetery offers a quiet tour of Key West’s past, featuring a memorial to American sailors who died in the explosion of the USS Maine in 1898 along with legendary headstones that read, “I told you I was sick,” and, “At least I know where he’s sleeping tonight.”

A visit to Key West Audubon House and Gardens, Key West Harbour and the Florida Eco-Discovery Center make for a nice day and don’t forget a piece of Key Lime Pie, served at a variety of locations. Download a Key West vacation planner here.

travel brochuresButterfly World in Coconut Creek, Florida, is one of a number of attractions that host aviaries filled with butterflies and free-flying birds. This one lets visitors enter their man-made tropical rain forest, a living habitat with a mist-filled cave and a cascading waterfall.

Butterfly World features six aviaries, live butterflies, Hummingbirds, an Insectarium, a Butterfly museum and more. Open seven days a week, Butterfly World is the largest butterfly and bird park in the world.

travel brochuresMiami Seaquarium is a 38-acre tropical paradise that is home to Lolita The Killer Whale, Salty the Sea Lion and everything else one might expect from an aquarium located minutes from the ocean.

At Dolphin Harbor, visitors can connect with one of the ocean’s most intelligent creatures doing a deep-water swim that has no swimming or height restrictions.

In addition to sea life from sea turtles and manatees to sharks and stingrays, unique to Miami Seaquarium are a number of animal and tourism experts on hand to share information and answer questions.

Here’s more about Florida, featuring Florida swamps, working cattle ranches, beautiful lakes and streams, and incredible wildlife.

Filed under: Festivals and Events, North America, United States, Theme Parks

Article source: http://www.gadling.com/2012/10/31/travel-brochure-finds-the-best-key-lime-pie-and-more-from-flori/

Gasoline falls as Northeast travel remains restricted after storm; refinery …

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Article source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/global-oil-prices-rise-on-supply-concerns-as-superstorm-continues-to-pummel-northeastern-us/2012/10/31/aba4215c-2326-11e2-92f8-7f9c4daf276a_story.html

Northeast travel slowly resumes, with airports reopening; train service …

Travelers and commuters were forced to cobble together ways to get home, or stay where they were.

But by Wednesday, the region’s massive network of planes, trains and buses was slowly restarting.

Flights resumed at airports, including two of New York City’s three major airports. Limited subway service is expected Thursday in the city.

Major rail service in the region remained largely suspended, however. While some commuter lines are expected back Wednesday afternoon, Amtrak’s Northeast Regional service between Newark, N.J., and Boston is suspended and so is Acela Express service for the Northeast corridor. No date is set for resumption of that service.

Air travelers stranded by Sandy are a little closer to getting home. There are limited flights at John F. Kennedy International and Newark Liberty International. The city’s third major airport, LaGuardia, is still closed as authorities assessed the damage from the huge storm. Travelers hoping to fly out of New York are being told to check with their airline before heading to the airport.

Airports in Washington and Philadelphia re-opened on Tuesday.

FlightStats said the storm had caused more than 19,000 cancellations since it began, including 2,820 cancellations in North America on Wednesday.

Delta was resuming some flights at JFK on Wednesday. But other airlines, including American and Southwest, both said they won’t resume New York flights until Thursday.

LaGuardia was another story. Several airlines said they hoped to resume flying there on Thursday. But airport authorities said they don’t know yet when LaGuardia will reopen.

“There are a lot of contingencies before we can re-open at LaGuardia,” Southwest spokesman Paul Flaningan said. “It’s still barricaded at the front entrance, which makes drop-offs from taxis and buses difficult.”

Airlines continued to waive fees to change tickets for flights to New York airports. Delta and United said that anyone who planned to fly there through Saturday could change their ticket. However, the re-booked travel still had to begin by Nov. 9, giving travelers a relatively narrow window to make their trip.

American’s waiver was broader, covering New York tickets through Nov. 7, and allowing rebooked travel through Dec. 20.

Amtrak said on Wednesday that it has restored train service to Newark airport. But service to and from New York’s Penn Station was still not operating because tunnels under the Hudson and East rivers are flooded.

___

Associated Press writer Joan Lowy contributed to this report.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Article source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/northeast-air-travel-slowly-resumes-as-jfk-newark-airports-reopen-laguardia-still-closed/2012/10/31/2985c3b0-2376-11e2-92f8-7f9c4daf276a_story.html

SKorean city to remake village into Macau rival

The city, 28 kilometers (17 miles) west of the capital Seoul, hopes to eventually attract up to $290 billion in investments by 2030 to build casinos, hotels, auto racing tracks, a marina and K-pop concert halls in its district of Yongyu-Muui.

Article source: http://www.boston.com/travel/destinations/2012/10/31/skorean-city-remake-village-into-macau-rival/CwurAdoFndVDyq0jec3zyL/story.html

Personal Travel Assistant WorldMate Gets Scooped Up By Carlson Wagonlit For …

After more than a decade of helping to manage the friendly skies, it seems that mobile travel assistant WorldMate is coming in for a landing at its final destination as an independent company. Carlson Waglit Travel (CWT), one of the largest travel agencies in the world, has agreed to acquire WorldMate in an all-cash deal, TechCrunch learned today. According to sources with knowledge of the deal, the purchase price is about $20 million.

Founded in 2000, WorldMate began its life as a software vendor for Palm, but is today known as the maker of mobile apps for iOS, Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone that allow travelers to plan trips, book hotels and car rentals and organize itineraries. The company is currently headquartered in San Francisco with RD offices in Israel, the company’s home turf.

After raising $8 million as one of BlackBerry Venture Fund’s first outside investments in 2008, the company changed its name from MobiMate and began to hit its stride. By 2010, the company had collected 5 million users and began partnering with big names like American Express and TravelPort, along with inking its first deal with CWT.

At the time, CWT was looking to begin pushing more aggressively onto mobile platforms and social networks, and its partnership with WorldMate marked the first step in that process. Usurprising in retrospect, but it was at about this time that acquisition rumors first started to surface, with RCRW Unplugged and Calcalist reporting that the partnerships had led to buyout talks with TravelPort and Amex, with the Israeli newspaper claiming that offers were as high as $60 million.

WorldMate founder Nadav Gur “vehemently denied the rumors,” according to RCRW. A source with intimate knowledge of the matter informed us that a board member leaked the rumors to the press in an attempt to drive up the price. That, plus the fact that its revenues were at around $6 million in 2010, and it’s not exactly a huge shock the deal didn’t pan out.

Since then, WorldMate has largely flown under the radar, which is somewhat surprising considering the company today reports that its apps have been used by 10 million travelers to date to plan their trips, with a total of 3.7 million registered users, 9 billion miles and 2.9 million itineraries managed this year.

Not only that, but WorldMate was early to market, pivoted successfully multiple times and seemed to be hitting the right notes by beefing up its hotel booking service, offering users automated suggestions for hotels that they may like based on their past usage and personal data, launching APIs, including support for 20 languages, low marketing spend and what have apparently been increasing revenues thanks to white label/API offerings.

To that point, the startup makes money through a number of different channels. It started off mostly focused on subscription, but has since expanded to lead generation for hotel and car rental properties like Expedia, white label versions of its apps, licensing its APIs and advertising.

Granted, it was through these revenue channels, WorldMate has managed to weather the changes in mobile platforms and OSes, adapting, too, by focusing on incremental changes. Of course, while the business has remained solid, it never took off either. As in every other case with startups, there was a lot of optimism and cheerleading, and obviously one (or multiple) areas weren’t quite as rosy as they’ve been made to seem.

What’s more, the $20 to $25 million acquisition price is small peanuts for CWT, which according to its 2011 numbers, operates in more than 150 countries, has 20K employees and saw $28 billion in aggregate sales.

While the business travel management giant gets an established mobile channel through which to distribute its security solutions, alerts, crisis communication, destination intelligence and among others, one source intimately familiar with the deal said that its “wasn’t exactly a homerun” for WorldMate, which raised a total of $15 million in venture capital.

The deal is expected to close later this week, with an official announcement coming in the next few days. We’ll update when we learn more.


  • WORLDMATE

WorldMate develops and operates the world’s leading and largest mobile travel itinerary management platform. The platform collates structured itineraries by recognizing and then parsing confirmation emails from all significant travel providers worldwide. The itineraries are then accessible via the WorldMate web application and a comprehensive mobile application making WorldMate the must have mobile app for any traveler.

WorldMate has millions of mobile users and manages millions of itineraries in over 20 languages worldwide. The WorldMate app provides users with a…

→ Learn more

Article source: http://techcrunch.com/2012/10/31/personal-travel-assistant-worldmate-gets-scooped-up-by-carlson-wagonlit-for-20m/

JFK Joins Newark Opening as Air-Travel Disruptions Ease

Two metropolitan New York airports,
John F. Kennedy and Newark Liberty, opened for some flights
today as Atlantic superstorm Sandy’s disruption of the busiest
U.S. aviation market starts to ease.

New York’s LaGuardia remains closed while damage
assessments continue, said Ron Marsico, a spokesman for the Port
Authority of New York New Jersey. A JetBlue Airways Corp. (JBLU)
plane landed at Kennedy from Long Beach, California, at 7:04
a.m., and a FedEx Corp. (FDX) jet arrived at 7:12 a.m. at Newark.

“It is still limited service,” Marsico said in a
telephone interview. “We might be talking in the hundreds of
flights today.”

New York’s airports closed late on Oct. 29 and have lagged
behind the recovery of East Coast peers as carriers rebuild
schedules in cities such as Boston, Philadelphia and Washington.
LaGuardia and Newark each had more than 1,200 flights canceled
yesterday, the most in the nation, industry researcher
FlightAware said.

“Damage from the storm has been extensive,” United
Continental Holdings Inc. (UAL)
Chief Executive Officer Jeff Smisek
told employees in a letter yesterday. “The runways at LaGuardia
have been flooded, and there has been some facility damage at
Newark that we are currently assessing.”

Airlines pulled planes out of the region on Oct. 28 as
then-Hurricane Sandy barreled toward landfall, and the Port
Authority announced the closing of the three airports late the
following day. New Jersey’s Teterboro airport also remained
closed early today, Marsico said.

Delta Flights

Delta Air Lines Inc. (DAL) expects some flights today at Kennedy,
said Morgan Durrant, a spokesman for the Atlanta-based airline.
A Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) spokeswoman, Olga Romero, said the
Dallas-based carrier may be flying at LaGuardia after 1 p.m. New
York time.

AMR Corp. (AAMRQ)’s American Airlines and Tempe, Arizona-based US
Airways Group Inc. (LCC)
are working toward tomorrow in New York.
Andrea Huguely, a spokeswoman for Fort Worth, Texas-based
American, said “substantial flooding” occurred at all three
airports.

“US Airways operations at LaGuardia, JFK and Newark will
remain idle until at least noon on Thursday,” Chief Operating
Officer Robert Isom said yesterday in a message to employees.
“LaGuardia, in particular, was hard hit with several feet of
standing water currently on runways and ramp areas.”

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo told reporters that he
didn’t expect LaGuardia to open today.

Chicago Cancellations

Counting scrapped trips since Oct. 28, the cancellations
tally attributable to Sandy exceeded 18,100, FlightAware said
yesterday. Chicago’s O’Hare airport scrubbed almost 500 East
Coast arrivals and departures yesterday, the city’s aviation
department said.

CEO Rick Seaney of travel website FareCompare estimated
that about 1.5 million airline passengers had travel plans
interrupted by Sandy in the two days through yesterday. Some
cancellations will persist as airlines reposition planes and
people after the “freak storm,” he said.

“We might have a lingering effect, but it should be good
to go for road warriors on Monday,” he said.

With New York’s airports not operating at normal levels,
disruptions would continue to ripple outward. Together, they
handle more passengers in a year than Atlanta’s Hartsfield, the
busiest U.S. facility. Kennedy is an international base for
Delta and American, as well as alliance partners such as Air
France-KLM (AF)
Group and British Airways (IAG), respectively. LaGuardia’s
flights are mostly domestic.

Taxiways Awash

Sandy’s wrath was felt in floods spilling across New York’s
waterfront tarmacs, United’s loss of electricity at Newark
yesterday and even the continuing subway shutdown, robbing
airlines of the airport workers needed to return operations to
normal.

Photos posted on JetBlue’s blog and Twitter account showed
LaGuardia aprons and taxiways awash, with water lapping at the
wheels of a jet bridge in one image.

“It’s not super high … but certainly deep enough to
cause major disruptions to our operation,” JetBlue said in a
message posted in response to a Twitter follower who inquired
about the picture. LaGuardia is a secondary airport for JetBlue,
whose main base is Kennedy.

Runway Inspections

Airport officials will have to inspect runways for damage
and debris and ensure that lighting and other equipment is
working before operations can resume, said Debbie McElroy, a
spokeswoman for the Washington-based Airports Council
International-North America trade group.

The Federal Aviation Administration is responsible for gear
such as radars and radios, and it is “conducting a damage
assessment to quickly repair or re-establish any damaged air
traffic facilities or critical navigational aids,” according to
an e-mailed statement.

Bounded on two sides by the waters of Flushing Bay,
LaGuardia is as low as 6.7 feet (2 meters) above sea level at
its southeast corner, according to AirNav.com, an aviation-data
website.

A 2010 report from the New York State Department of
Environmental Conservation on rising sea levels identified the
airport as a flooding risk.

“A ten-foot storm surge, similar to that of Hurricane
Donna in 1960, would begin to overtop its protective barriers,”
according to the report. Flood damage wouldn’t be uniform,
according to the report, saying “a more detailed study is
needed to evaluate which areas would be most vulnerable.”

Cargo Flights

Air-freight operations slowed on the East Coast along with
passenger flights. United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS) planned to open
its airport gateways in the region late yesterday, with the
exception of Newark and Kennedy, said Susan Rosenberg, a
spokeswoman for the Atlanta-based company.

UPS’s ground operations will be running in New York City,
New York’s Long Island and Connecticut, she said. Delays will
linger in parts of New Jersey, where downed trees and power
lines make deliveries difficult, as well as in snow-covered West
Virginia, Rosenberg said in a telephone interview.

FedEx, which is based in Memphis, Tennessee, and operates
the world’s largest cargo airline, also is working back toward
normal service, said a spokeswoman, Shea Leordeanu.

“In most areas, we’re going to be at near normal
operations,” Leordeanu said by telephone. “But we will still
have localized delays based on both safety and accessibility.”

To contact the reporters on this story:
Mary Schlangenstein in Dallas at
maryc.s@bloomberg.net;
Mary Jane Credeur in Atlanta at
mcredeur@bloomberg.net;
Victoria Stilwell in New York at
vstilwell1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Ed Dufner at
edufner@bloomberg.net


Enlarge image
JFK Joins Newark Airport in Reopening as Sandy Disruptions Ease

JFK Joins Newark Airport in Reopening as Sandy Disruptions Ease

JFK Joins Newark Airport in Reopening as Sandy Disruptions Ease

Scott Eells/Bloomberg

Ticketing kiosks stand wrapped in plastic at LaGuardia Airport in New York.

Ticketing kiosks stand wrapped in plastic at LaGuardia Airport in New York. Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg


20% of U.S. Economic Activity Affected by Sandy

Oct. 30 (Bloomberg) — Bloomberg’s Michael McKee reports on the economic cost of Hurricane Sandy. He speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)


Sandy's Wake of Destruction (Slideshow)

Oct. 30 (Bloomberg) — Record flooding knocked out power to more than 8 million people in the U.S. Northeast, shutting down public transportation and paralyzing Manhattan’s financial district as remnants of superstorm Sandy churned west.
This slideshow illustrates the storm’s impact from coastal New Jersey to the shores of Lake Michigan. (Source: Bloomberg)


Sandy Leaves Lower Manhattan in the Dark

Oct. 30 (Bloomberg) — Bloomberg’s Dominic Chu reports on the lack of power in downtown Manhattan after Hurricane Sandy passed through. He speaks on Bloomberg Television’s “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)


Wildwood, N.J. Business Owner on Sandy Flooding

Oct. 30 (Bloomberg) — Deborah Amundsen, a chiropractor based in Wildwood, New Jersey, talks to Bloomberg’s Terrence Dopp about Hurricane Sandy’s impact on the shore town and her business office. (Source: Bloomberg)


Enlarge image
Sandy Ravages Airline Flight Schedules as Toll Rivals Blizzards

Sandy Ravages Airline Flight Schedules as Toll Rivals Blizzards’

Sandy Ravages Airline Flight Schedules as Toll Rivals Blizzards

Scott Eells/Bloomberg

A flight information terminal displays cancelled flights at LaGuardia Airport in New York.

A flight information terminal displays cancelled flights at LaGuardia Airport in New York. Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg

Article source: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-10-31/jfk-joins-newark-reopening-as-air-travel-disruptions-ease.html