How travel limits our minds

Slumping into the cramped confines of my seat, recovering my composure after a frantic, protracted check-in that made me mislay my wallet, almost miss my flight, and become €100 poorer, the result of my experiment in travel seemed obvious: boats and trains beat the pains of planes any day.

But the real problem with air travel is not the carbon footprint, the hassle of security checks, the tedium of the boarding gate, the soulless sprawl of the hire car lot, or Ryanair‘s excessive excess charges and unavoidable fees for allegedly optional extras. The deeper issue is that how we travel reflects and shapes the way we think, and we have become a society of airheads.

I started thinking about this because of a recurring desire to recreate an annual childhood journey by ferry and overnight train to visit our family in northern Italy. Was it just nostalgia pulling me, or is something of real value lost at 30,000ft? I decided to go to Italy the old way and return the new, to see how the experiences really compared.

The passenger terminal at Dover docks did not provide the most promising start, having all the charm of a 1970s coach station. But once on deck, with the white cliffs fading into the distance, I had a real sense of a proper trip starting, something that the palm-sweat-inducing jolt of take-off doesn’t provide. The sedate passage of the ship, the gradual emergence of the French coast, and the disembarkation in the open air, with a real town in clear sight, provided a sense of the continuities between places. In contrast, planes simply transport you from one anonymous, homogenous edgeland to another, between airports virtually identical in their black and yellow signage and multinational franchises. It’s the difference between travel – a movement between places in which the journey is part of the experience – and transit, the utilitarian linking of here and there, in which the destination becomes all that matters and the transfer simply something to put up with.

This was most evident in the gaps between each leg of the journey. Stopping for an early dinner in Paris at one of Café Charlot’s street tables, the attraction of this is obvious. In contrast, the park next door to Gare Calais Ville is not exactly the idyllic location for a tasty picnic gathered from a nearby boulangerie. It appears to be a garden of lost souls, populated by people with vacant stares, not so much filling time as biding it, abiding in it, with no sense of anything to do. However, places like these and the makeshift tents and camps of asylum-seekers viewed from the bus from port to train station – interesting rather than obviously pleasant – often become the most memorable parts of journeys, and you only see them when travelling indirectly, in the interstices of the conventionally appealing.

Consumer culture has made us too accustomed to getting only what we want, no more and no less. Experiences are atomised into their component parts, the extraneous excised in an attempt to maximise the impact of the parts we prefer, with no thought to how their context changes them. But if you only ever get what you know you already want, serendipity is denied and the richness of experience is reduced to the button-pushing delivery of crude hits of fun, excitement, novelty or reassurance, often consumed in the private bubble of home or headphone.

In this respect, train travel on commuter routes has, alas, gone the same way as flying, as I am reminded on the two-hour TGV ride from Calais to Paris. But on longer distances, there is a palpably different attitude among travellers. Accompanying us in our four-berth couchette from Paris to Milan, for example, were Amanda and Ian from New Zealand. They were taking this trip because Amanda has a wonderful and vivid memory of stepping out of an overnight train into a Venetian dawn 20-odd years ago. Say what you like about flying, but North Terminal at Gatwick just doesn’t have the same effect.

In some ways train travel demands more of us. But even at 5.50am, after a night of interrupted sleep in a narrow bunk, the great terminus of Milano Centrale has infinitely more charm than any baggage reclaim area. It is a contemporary malaise to avoid things that require effort but are rewarding in favour of gains in convenience that come at the price of blandness and loss of variety.

How different the flight back was, starting with the frantic and pointless shifting of luggage from one bag to another required by Ryanair’s punitive baggage policy. Worse, as I went to pay the €100 excess, I couldn’t find my wallet, which had slipped unnoticed into the long-gone hold bag in the confusion. After rushing through security dangerously and predictably late, yet not predictably enough for us to have relaxed in the first place, the long queue of passengers is still boarding. The only redeeming feature of the whole flight was the magnificent view of the Alps from above.

It might be objected that “slow travel” is just an indulgence of the time and cash-rich. But you actually gain holiday time when travelling is an integral part of the experience, because you lose none to mere transit. As for expense, the gap was not so wide, and was almost nothing after the excess baggage fee. And yet despite all I’ve written, I admit I have another trip coming up and, guess what, I’m flying. I’m just another airhead, led by apparent ease and convenience away from what is more profoundly rewarding.

Article source: http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2012/sep/30/how-travel-limits-our-minds?newsfeed=true

New Travel Channel show goes behind the scenes at Miami International Airport

“We host a Super Bowl every day at MIA,” security director Lauren Stover said, comparing the number of travelers to attendance at the championship football game.

With thousands of employees running what can easily be compared to a small city, the show follows workers as they deal with terrorist threats, intercept drug smugglers, attend to medical emergencies, repair aircraft and secure an Air Force One landing, all the while trying to get the passengers to their flights and the planes in the sky on time.

“This is one of many ways in which Travel Channel is trying to give viewers a different look at all aspects of travel,” network general manager Andy Singer said. “And we think the Miami International Airport is a fascinating way to do that.”

The first two episodes of the show premier back-to-back at 9 p.m. Tuesday.

The idea for the show started with 2C Media owner Chris Sloan, who said he’s had a passion for commercial aviation since he was a child. His longtime hobby has been collecting photos and memorabilia from airports around the world. He’s even been maintaining a website about airports and airlines — airchive.com — for nearly a decade.

“I travel a lot,” Sloan said. “And I felt that this was a world that was much maligned.”

Sloan said it was challenging to convince airport officials he wasn’t trying to do some kind of expose or smear job. And once MIA agreed to the show, they still had to convince multiple airlines and government agencies to give them access, Sloan said. But their patience and perseverance appeared to pay off.

“Whenever you go to an airport, there are always signs that say, ‘Staff Only,’ ‘Do Not Enter,’ ‘Prohibited Area,’ ‘Alarm Will Go Off,’” Sloan said. “But we actually go to all those places, and that’s unique.”

Ken Pyatt, MIA’s deputy director of operations, said he was surprised by how dramatic the show turned out to be. He said he thought the show would be more matter-of-fact in its presentation of different areas of the airport. Instead, camera crews spent several months earlier this year following employees around, showing rather than telling the types of challenges workers face on a regular basis.

“I think the editing of the show is amazing,” Pyatt said. “How they were able to put these little vignettes together each show and actually tell four or five stories.”

Pyatt said he particularly enjoyed a later episode that deals with Air Force One landing in Miami the same day that the budget airline Interjet is scheduled to hold an event celebrating its inaugural flight between Miami and Mexico City. The Interjet event, with celebrities and local officials set to attend, had been scheduled at least month in advance, Pyatt said. But when the president comes to town, everything else becomes secondary to that.

Article source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/travel/new-travel-channel-show-goes-behind-the-scenes-at-miami-international-airport/2012/09/30/335bd94c-0b25-11e2-97a7-45c05ef136b2_story.html

Venezuelans in Miami planning to travel en masse to New Orleans to vote

It’s a hardship in terms of time and money for many potential voters. But some, especially those who want to stop Chavez from being re-elected after 13 years in power, are determined to make the trip anyway.

Carolina Guevara, a 21-year-old college student, plans to take the 15-hour bus ride from Miami to the Louisiana capital, an 870-mile (1,400-kilometer) trek.

“We want to demonstrate to the government that even if they put obstacles in our path, we will practice our right to vote,” said Guevara, who hopes to return to Venezuela after completing her political science studies at Miami Dade College.

The Venezuelan government closed its Miami mission after the State Department expelled consul Livia Acosta amid an investigation into recordings that seemed to implicate her in an Iranian plot for a cyber-attack against the U.S.

The closure affected nearly 20,000 Venezuelan voters living in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina who had registered to vote at the Miami consulate. Most Venezuelan voters in the United States live in the Miami area and the vast majority of those are critical of the Chavez government.

After the Miami mission closed, Venezuelan election officials said that voters registered there would have to cast ballots in New Orleans, where the next-nearest consulate is located. Venezuelan opposition leaders accused the government of trying to disenfranchise voters, a charge officials denied.

“They tried to do everything possible to prevent us from voting,” said Gisela Parra, a former judge who left Venezuela in 2005 after being accused of conspiring against Chavez. “The pressure was such that they had to open a voting center far away, in New Orleans. It’s like punishing us.”

Parra, who plans to volunteer at the New Orleans voting center, said Venezuelan electoral officials “had the obligation” to make another Miami location available.

But Tibisay Lucena, president of Venezuela’s Elections Council, countered that voters registered in Miami “were relocated using the same criteria used inside the country, telling them to go to the nearest polling station.”

About 15,800 Venezuelans in the U.S. voted in their country’s Dec. 2006 presidential election, three-quarters of them in Miami.

Of the 10,800 Venezuelans voting in Florida, 98 percent cast ballots for the opposition candidate and 2 percent for Chavez. Thirty-four percent of registered voters did not participate, according to figures from Venezuela’s Elections Council.

Article source: http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/venezuelans-in-miami-planning-to-travel-en-masse-to-new-orleans-to-vote/2012/09/30/5b30962e-0b11-11e2-97a7-45c05ef136b2_story.html

Travel: Three Rivers Petroglyph Park — An ever-changing palette of light and … – Las Cruces Sun

Click photo to enlargeWe live in a fast and often-frenzied modern world. In response, the modern art scene has responded with a number of trends such as the rapid action paintings of Willem de Kooning that became a sensation. Andy Warhol told us about the 15 minutes of fame with his portraits of Marilyn Monroe and other celebrities that came and went. But high on a remote ridge in the Tularosa Basin sits an entirely different kind of art gallery in a wide natural valley that is arranged by natural forces.

On the western slope of the towering Sierra Blanca, an upthrust of the Rio Grande Rift is delineated by an 800-foot-high chain of standing stones, emerging like teeth, ranging from a few feet high to several yards and extending 1-1/2 miles in an almost precise north-south direction. These stone faces were selected as the canvas for recording images important to the earliest inhabitants from Paleo-Indian to ancestral Pueblo member groups.

The Three Rivers Petroglyph Park is maintained by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and it hosts thousands of well-made, very old symbols on stone. These symbols took many hours and perhaps days to be made. Far different from some modern art techniques, images were remade time and again by people over centuries who wanted to restate and remember images handed down from far earlier times.

High up on this ridge, you can look out in every direction. Just the effect of vast spaciousness is a sharp contrast to white walls, ceilings and changing exhibits of our modern

art galleries. This landscape gives a sense of permanence and, at the same time, unbounded views of ever-changing cloud formations building up over mountain peaks over the course of day, wind that comes and goes in waves, or simply the play of sunlight animating the entire basin in all its atmospheric majesty. That experience sets many visitors free to soar into their imaginations.

With one of the highest number of petroglyphic images of any site in the American Southwest, some 21,000 in all, some symbols stand out as especially important to the image makers. The people themselves left some 500 of their faces and masks for us to contemplate, along with special animals, birds and reptiles of their world. There are more bird images than any other petroglyph gallery in the Southwest — turkey, quail, hawks and swallows are among the more recognizable to our eyes. These birds still range the surrounding open spaces while crows, hawks and eagles circle from their higher distance.

More than 2,500 circles have been found and documented in archaeological surveys and field schools — concentric circles, circles with crosses within them, clusters of elaborate circles with filled centers framed with dots all around.

Interspersed among the circles and perhaps most impressive are single line mazes framed by the edges of the stones. Many of the stones themselves are like three dimensional monuments weighing tons, oriented almost perfectly north to south, east to west. Spaces between parallel stones create shafts of flowing sunlight over the course of a day, illuminating a circle or a flat stone with an image for a specific moment of time.

The dynamic play of light and shadow requires a close attention to the position of the light and the season as well. The sun is high in the sky during summer, lower during the spring and fall, and lowest in the mid-winter. A photograph of an ancient image will never the same and many find challenges they never expected — and unexpected drama to review time and again. Artists, too, find a solitude and sense of natural time as they sketch and paint out in the open air.

As early as 1925, archeologists began a scientific investigation of the ridge and a village at its base close to the river, identifying pottery types of both local manufacture and trade pottery coming in from other production sites as far away as the highly acclaimed Mimbres pottery in the southern Gila Mountains. C.B. and Harry Cosgrove archived their notes, preliminary report and artifacts at the Centennial Museum at the University of Texas in El Paso.

Many more field schools and excavations followed to document the complex cultural groups that lived nearby. Now professionals such as Barbara Moulard see the cultural and visual links between pottery designs and nearby petroglyphs. The painted bowls, water jugs and cups inside the homes at Three Rivers reflected the world outside where they hunted, planted, prepared their meals and made their implements and clothing
Several books and monographs can be reviewed at the reception office at Three Rivers Petroglyph Park for those who become more than mildly curious about the meaning of these permanent images on stone. BLM hosts are on hand to direct a student as well and to remind the visitors of the special cultural resources of American antiquity that the Three Rivers Petroglyph site has to offer to the modern world.

For more information on recreational and environmental features and a glimpse of the fine gallery of images, the BLM has a web site to visit before going there: www.blm.gov/nm/st/en/prog/recreation/las_cruces/three_rivers.html

Joan E. Price is a freelance photographer and writer based in Tularosa, N.M. She may be reached at rainhousejoan@hotmail.com.

Article source: http://www.lcsun-news.com/las_cruces-sunlife/ci_21665973/travel-three-rivers-petroglyph-park-mdash-an-ever

‘You can travel to a country in less than a minute’

International Festival

International Festival

Children practice the Mexican hat dance during the Bowling Green International Festival at Circus Square Park, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Photo by Alex Slitz/Daily News)

International Festival

International Festival

Marguerite Barnette, of Sarasota, Fla., preforms on stage during the Bowling Green International Festival at Circus Square Park, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Photo by Alex Slitz/Daily News)

International Festival

International Festival

Burmese dancers wait on stage to perform a traditional dance the Bowling Green International Festival at Circus Square Park, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Photo by Alex Slitz/Daily News)

International Festival

International Festival

Thousands of people fill Circus Square Park for the Bowling Green International Festival, Saturday, Sept. 29, 2012, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Photo by Alex Slitz/Daily News)


Posted: Sunday, September 30, 2012 2:00 am
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Updated: 9:41 pm, Sat Sep 29, 2012.


‘You can travel to a country in less than a minute’

By LAUREL WILSON
The Daily News
lwilson@bgdailynews.com/783-3240

bgdailynews.com

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Though Peter Lapham of Glasgow wasn’t born in Scotland, he feels connected to the country because his ancestors came from there.


“I have Scottish blood, and I’m incredibly proud of it,” he said.

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on

Sunday, September 30, 2012 2:00 am.

Updated: 9:41 pm.

Article source: http://www.bgdailynews.com/news/local/you-can-travel-to-a-country-in-less-than-a/article_50692b3a-0aa7-11e2-b8ba-0019bb2963f4.html

Titans travel to Houston for first divisional game

The Tennessee Titans (1-2) will open divisional play Sunday against the Houston Texans (3-0).

The Titans are coming off a thrilling week 3 win against the Detroit Lions in which Tennessee set an NFL record with five touchdowns on plays of 60 yards or more.

While the week 4 matchup may not equal the previous game in thrills, it can’t be emphasized more how important this game is to the Titans.

The Titans will have their hands full on the offense side of the ball Sunday with the Texans boasting a defense that is third in the league in scoring defense, averaging 14.0 points a game, and second in total defense, allowing 255.7 yards a game.

On the other side of the ball, the Texans are led by running back Arian Foster who has 294 yards rushing on a league high 79 carries. The Texans as a team are averaging 150.3 yards a game on the ground, which is coincidentally the same amount the Titans defense is allowing per game.

Meanwhile the offensive attack is led by Matt Schaub who is coming off a career high four touchdown performance in a win against the Denver Broncos. Schaub should have no problem continuing his strong start to the season against a Titans defense that is giving up a league high 37.7 points a game. Look for passes to Andre Johnson and Owen Daniels who lead the team in receptions with 13 each.

The Titans offense enters into this matchup following an offensive explosion against the Lions, which saw Jake Locker come alive with 378 yards passing and two touchdowns to Jared Cook and Nate Washington.

Not included in this offensive explosion was Chris Johnson, who continues to struggle on the season, earning only 24 yards for the game. For the season he has only produced 45 yards on 33 carries, a shocking statistic for the former 2,000 yard rusher.

On the injury side of the ball the Titans will welcome the appearance of backup running back Javon Ringer, who will see his first action of the season after recovering from a staph infection that he sustained during the offseason.

However, the Titans will be without linebacker Colin McCarthy, who is still plagued by an ankle injury that forced him to miss last week’s matchup. Tight end Jared Cook is listed as questionable, but the Titans are confident he will play following his participation in practice on Thursday and Friday. Wide receiver Kenny Britt is also questionable with an ankle injury that has forced him to miss practice all week.  

For Houston, they will be without wide receiver Lestar Jean, who is recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery. Starting cornerback Jonathan Joseph is listed as questionable, but is likely to play with a groin injury and star wide receiver Andre Johnson is probable with a groin injury.

The Titans and Texans are scheduled to kickoff at 1:05 ET at Reliant Stadium in Houston.

Article source: http://tnjn.com/2012/sep/29/titans-travel-to-houston-for-f/

Travel Troubleshooter: Hello? ‘Free’ phone access adds up

I stayed at the Wingate by Wyndham Charlotte Airport, and on the first night, I was having some cellphone problems. Knowing that other Wyndham properties offer free long distance, I decided to look in the hotel services book provided in the room. Under the telephone section, it says: “Local calls are free of charge. Long-distance access in the United States is complimentary.” I read this to mean that long-distance calls would be free, so I proceeded to make two long-distance calls to my wife, totaling maybe an hour at most.

I was charged almost $50 for these calls.

After getting the runaround for a few days, I was finally put in contact with the assistant to the general manager. She informed me that only the access is free, not the actual long- distance charges.

I don’t know about you, but that is like saying that Internet access is free, but later you find out that only the access to the Internet provider was free and they are now billing you for actually using the Internet.

I’ve tried contacting the Wyndham customer service number, but they say it’s up to the property to resolve this. Do you have any advice?

– Tyson Howard, Cincinnati

I agree. The guest directory looks like long-distance calls at the hotel are free. Wingate doesn’t appear to have a chain-wide policy on phone charges, which is fine, since almost no one uses a hotel phone anymore except maybe to call the front desk.

I can remember a time when phones were a major profit center for hotels, and guests complained about fees and outrageously high per-minute rates. Usually, the hotels would back down when guests protested, mostly because they felt guilty about padding their charges to rake in extra profits.

But those days are long gone – or so I thought.

My advice? Stay off the phone. And I don’t just mean waiting to talk to your wife until your cellphone is charged. I mean, stay off the phone when you’re trying to resolve this with Wyndham corporate. A brief, polite email would have been far more effective, and less stressful, and wouldn’t have required you making multiple inquiries.

Based on your description of the phone fees, I thought you had a strong case for removing the bill. I contacted Wyndham on your behalf, and a representative called you and said corporate Wyndham would cut you a check for $50 to cover the phone bill.

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Article source: http://www.sacbee.com/2012/09/30/4861739/hello-free-phone-access-adds-up.html

The Amazing Race: ‘We’re a travel show on Red Bull’

‘Looper’ Director: Memory A Form Of Time Travel

Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt play different versions of the same character in the time-travel thriller Looper.
Enlarge Alan Markfield/Sony Pictures

Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt play different versions of the same character in the time-travel thriller Looper.

Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt play different versions of the same character in the time-travel thriller Looper.

Alan Markfield/Sony Pictures

Bruce Willis and Joseph Gordon-Levitt play different versions of the same character in the time-travel thriller Looper.

Looper is a time traveling action flick set in the year 2044. Star Joseph Gordon-Levitt plays a paid assassin who makes the startling discovery that his next target is actually himself — an older version of himself from the future.

After that it gets a little timey-wimey — but basically, Bruce Willis plays the older, supposedly wiser assassin — and he’s been sent back in time by a criminal syndicate to be erased from history. Director Rian Johnson tells NPR’s Rachel Martin that he originally wrote the script as a short film, inspired by the writings of Philip K. Dick. “I was reading all of his books, and I think my head was just kind of in this soup of time travel ideas,” he says.

Director Rian Johnson on the set of Looper.
Enlarge Alan Markfield/Sony Pictures

Director Rian Johnson on the set of Looper.

Director Rian Johnson on the set of Looper.

Alan Markfield/Sony Pictures

Director Rian Johnson on the set of Looper.

Time travel is a notoriously tricky plot to work with. Johnson says he looked back at classic time travel movies like 12 Monkeys and Back to the Future, and was reassured to find things even there that didn’t make sense. “But the magic trick of those movies is, it constructs this story where it really is like a magician with a deck of cards,” he says. “It fools you into believing it makes sense for two hours, so that you can go along on this ride.”

Anyone who’s thought about time travel has probably dreamed of doing something like killing Adolf Hitler — but Johnson says that’s not what he’s interested in. “It’s such a fantasy, kind of false moral conundrum,” Johnson says. “It’s something that has very little to do with real life, whereas the basic question of, does it work to solve the problem by finding the right person and killing them, or does that just create this self-perpetuating loop, that’s unfortunately something that is very applicable to the world around us. That’s the more interesting question to me.”

Johnson adds that time travel stories are intensely relatable — most people wonder about their past and future selves. “I think the most powerful form of time travel is memory,” he says. “Every day … we’ll kind of go off in our heads and revisit moments in our lives, and wish that we had done them differently.” And time travel stories can also be a warning, “the same way that Frankenstein stories are kind of a cautionary tale, sort of a ‘yes, you think you want that, but it actually wouldn’t help, it would actually make things worse’ … you think you want to revisit the past, but in reality you should just be living in the present.”

Reviews of ‘Looper’

Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis star as present and future versions of the same man in Looper.

Movie Reviews

Time And Crime, Thoroughly Crossed Up In ‘Looper’

For Looper, though, Johnson had to live not in the present, but the future — a place he imagines as looking relatively like the world we know now. “It’s not a big, shiny sci-fi world, it’s something that is … everything is just broken down, so it’s kind of a dystopian future,” he says. There’s no middle class, just rich society types and poor street people — though Johnson describes himself as an optimist, and says Looper‘s grim future was driven by character decisions.

“Our main character, Joe, much like a movie I looked to for inspiration was Casablanca, much like Rick in Casablanca, he’s beginning the movie in a very kind of isolated, self-serving place,” he says. “And it made sense, much like in Casablanca, to build a world around him where you saw that that kind of selfishness didn’t come from him being a bad person, but was because he has to exist in this world.”

Johnson adds that, were he to be able to travel in time, he would want to see the future — though maybe a little further out than the future depicted in Looper. “I’d say a hundred years is a good round number,” he says. “That’s far enough ahead to where it would make the journey worth it, to see what they’ve got, but not so far that you’re going to show up and be just like on a charred piece of earth, floating through the cosmos.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2012/09/30/161951624/looper-director-memory-a-form-of-time-travel

Kerala Travel Mart ends on a high note

Kochi, Sep 30 — The seventh edition of Kerala Travel Mart (KTM) came to a close on a high note Sunday on account of the sheer number of participants from abroad and within the country who took part.

“In spite of the recession, we could attract a sizable number of international buyers. The general mood has been one of optimism and fulfilment. The mart also gave the members of the industry an opportunity to interact and also ponder on the wider issues affecting our state including tackling the issue of waste,” said Riaz Ahmed, president of the KTM.

The final arrival figures looked very encouraging with 1,486 buyers, of whom 398 were international and 1,088 were domestic buyers.

Kerala Travel Mart 2012 identified waste management as one of the core issues to be addressed for projecting Kerala as a clean destination.

“Kerala Tourism and the tourism industry have decided to join hands along with the local community to begin a campaign to keep the destinations in the state clean by forming task forces at every location,” added Ahmed.

The highlight of the seventh edition was the showcasing of more than 50 new properties to the buyers. Besides, numerous new home stays also got a feel of how they could come closer to their prospective clients.

Hans Jorg Hussong, managing director, Comtour, and chairman, Discover India Society, said houseboats and operators should try to connect more with tourists.

“More investments should take place in creating environment friendly products like chemical toilets, good training should be imparted to the crew on the boats besides retaining the houseboat in its authentic state,” said Hussong.

Sarvin Warden, of Designer Holidays, opined that Kerala should attract the big spenders by having more restaurants, spas, and develop the marinas.

“Kerala should look at what the market wants, not what we want. Tourists should be able to fly in directly on non-stop flights to Kerala,” said Warden.

IANS



This article was distributed through the NewsCred Smartwire.

Original article © IANS / Daily News 2012

Article source: http://india.nydailynews.com/business/480cab3b4e1e197521f532eb96889b06/kerala-travel-mart-ends-on-a-high-note