Traveling 4 Health and Retirement Announces Expat Eduardo Saverin Lifestyle Choice

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It’s your money; live where you want to live!

The truth is that the U.S. doesn’t stack up to be a very economical or thriving place to live for the young or the old

Seattle, WA (PRWEB) May 31, 2012

Expatriate Eduardo Saverin Announces International Living is a Lifestyle. Traveling 4 Health and Retirement (THR) advocates the healthful choices and holistic alternatives available for baby boomers, expats, and travelers in global destination travel.

Expatriate relocation to new international living destination locations signal the shift in perceptions about destination travel as a first-step in exercising the freedom to live “where you want, when you want”.

Expatriates and journeyers searching options to quell increasing costs of living or to keep more of what they’ve earned acknowledge international living is a fresh alternative to domestic traditions of lifestyle and travel.

World traveling with travelers such as Eduardo Saverin and his recent departure from the United States mirrors sentiment of how destination travel can propel travelers into healthier and fiducially grounded economic living.

Traveling4HealthRetirement acknowledges travel is the destination of the joie de vivre in heart. Traveling4HealthRetirement presents the opportunities in vacationing, medical tourism, and destination travel for expatriates, world travelers, and the vibrant in thought and mind.

Self-made entrepreneur and co-founder of Facebook, Eduardo Saverin departed America to fulfill a greater lifestyle with new home destination Singapore. The separation touted as a decision for taxation privileges, Saverin selected an alternative to the increasing query of living internationally healthfully and enjoyably. International travel is a purposeful endeavor inviting opportunity to experience world culture and world environ free of frivolity stigma.

Saverin gave up U.S. citizenship in September amidst declining IPO valuation with Facebook shares. However spokesperson representative Sabrina Strauss provided a preparative professional insight.

“Eduardo recently found it more practical to become a resident of Singapore since he plans to live there for an indefinite period of time,” Strauss shared in publicly written statement. “He plans to invest in Brazilian and global companies that have strong interests in entering the Asian markets. Accordingly, it made the most sense for him to use Singapore as a home base.”

Traveling to alternative destinations is not a curative for the wealthy or famous. Decision for relocation is prenominate when travel preparation and tourism is an endeavor. Eduardo Saverin, his announcement, and the opportunity to explore newer directions with overseas living expunges the extemporal sentiments about durative costs in affordable travel.

The THR International Health Blog shares timely informative answers for the traveler and overseas journeyer. There are options for every traveler and culture seeker – traveling for health and retirement is at every searcher’s fingertips.

“The truth is that the U.S. doesn’t stack up to be a very economical or thriving place to live for the young or the old,” notes Traveling4HealthRetirement.

“Certainly economic restraints can mask one’s potential in life. There is a tendency to see the wealthy, like Saverin, and famous people as having “all” the choices in life, but that perspective is flawed” shares Ilene Little, radio personality and talk host of program, “Know Before You Go,” on Overseas Radio Network.

“It’s much easier and less expensive for a person of average means than the wealthy to live with less personal restrictions and experience greater privacy,” explains Ilene Little, “So, the ‘poor me’ attitude can be discarded by those who wish to do so.”

Life is an adventure. Shrinking from a healthy and affordable lifestyle is not the cinema verite of today’s baby boomers and world travelers. Saverin’s experience depicts the recapturing spirit of enjoyable and holistically conscious travel.

The definitive resource in global health, destination locations and international lifestyle, Traveling4HealthRetirement presents the advancements and empowering developments in vacationing, retirement and destination travel abroad. Travelers, medical professionals, and people desiring to learn more about Traveling4HealthRetirement’s growing user community and health providers may visit Traveling4HealthRetirement at http://www.Traveling4Health.com. Persons or care providers interested in becoming a member with Traveling4HealthRetirement’s online community should contact Ilene Little at +1.888.844.1005; Fax: +1.888.844.1005; Skype at Ilene.Little for additional information.

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Article source: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2012/5/prweb9553532.htm

Rewe takes over Czech travel firm Exim Tours


PRAGUE |
Thu May 31, 2012 5:28am EDT

PRAGUE May 31 (Reuters) – German retail and travel group
Rewe is taking over leading Czech tour operator Exim Tours to
boost its presence in central and eastern Europe.

“This is an important step in our expansion strategy,” Rewe
tourism head Norbert Fiebig said on Thursday about the deal to
buy 51 percent of Exim Tours for an undisclosed price.

“Partnership with Exim Tours is the gateway for us to the
most important emerging markets in eastern Europe.”

Travel groups such as European leader TUI Travel and
Thomas Cook have been carrying out acquisitions in
emerging markets, with both expanding into Russia recently.

Exim Tours, which specialises in taking Czechs, Hungarians,
Poles and Slovaks to Mediterranean beaches, had revenue of 225
million euros ($279 million) last year.

Rewe, which said it had 4.5 billion euros revenue from
tourism last year to make it the second-biggest German tour
operator, already operates retail stores in the Czech Republic
under the Billa and Penny brands.
($1 = 0.8069 euro)

(Reporting by Robert Mueller; Writing by Jan Lopatka; Editing
by Dan Lalor)

Article source: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/05/31/eximtours-rewe-idUSL5E8GV66620120531

Study says solo travel is on the rise

Travelers often run in pairs or packs, but more are willing to go it alone, a new study says.

Sixteen percent of 1,500 U.S. adults recently surveyed by American Express say they will take a trip alone, up from 12% last year.

Reasons could range from less of a stigma about going solo, to more adults living alone, to some travel providers doing away with the dreaded “single supplement.” That means someone traveling by his or herself pays the same for accommodations as does a duo.

Cruise lines have been getting kinder to singles. The Norwegian Epic has single cabins, as do Fred Olsen Cruises ships. Some hotels, particularly ones I’ve stayed in overseas (such as the Radisson Edwardian Kenilworth in London), have small single rooms with lower rates than their doubles.

Some spas don’t overly penalize singles. for instance The Biggest Loser Resorts (in Ivins, Utah; Malibu, Calif.; and the newest one near Niagara Falls, N.Y.) charge $2,695 a week for singles (room, meals and program included) and $2,295 a person for double occupancy.

Independenttraveler.com waxes poetic about the joys of traveling without a companion:

“People who have never traveled alone often describe their first solo trip as an almost religious experience. To take in new surroundings unfiltered by the prejudices, tastes or preferences of a traveling companion can be heady stuff. Traveling alone gives you the chance to indulge yourself fully.”

Readers, do you have any thoughts about single supplements or any recommendations for travel providers that make it easier for solo travelers?

Article source: http://travel.usatoday.com/destinations/dispatches/post/2012/05/study-says-solo-travel-is-on-the-rise/703747/1

Hechavarria cleared to travel to Canada

TORONTO . It has taken a long time, but Adeiny Hechavarria finally has his paperwork in order and is cleared for travel outside the United States, general manager Alex Anthopoulos says.

The Cuban defector, a prime prospect for the Toronto Blue Jays, missed two games with Triple-A Las Vegas to deal with “citizenship-type situations,” manager John Farrell said Tuesday.

Farrell’s comments raised speculation that Hechavarria still had not obtained the documents that would allow him to travel to Canada. When asked about the subject again on Wednesday, Farrell said he did not know whether Hechavarria would be able to come to Canada if the Blue Jays decided to call him up.

“I wish I had more for you on the specific details to that,” Farrell said. “I just know that he was going to be two days away to take care of the process at hand.”

But Anthopoulos said later in the day that Hechavarria’s paperwork is definitely in order. If the Jays wanted to put him on the big-league roster at the end of spring training, they could have, and they can call him up any time they choose, Anthopoulos said.

Hechavarria returned to his Las Vegas team, which was playing in Tucson, on Wednesday afternoon.

The 23-year-old prospect might have earned a September call-up last year but he was still working on obtaining citizenship and could not travel to Canada.

Over the winter, Hechavarria was invited to attend the Jays’ mini-camp for prospects at the Rogers Centre. He could not make it. His paperwork was still incomplete, he told club officials.

During spring training in February, he met with Anthopoulos and Farrell in Dunedin, Fla. Afterward, Farrell told reporters that Hechavarria said he had completed the citizenship process.

This week, speculation suggested Hechavarria might be called up to fill in for shortstop Yunel Escobar or second baseman Kelly Johnson, both of whom are nursing nagging injuries. If one goes on the disabled list, club officials would “probably have a lengthy internal discussion about Hech,” Farrell said Tuesday.

The Blue Jays considered calling up Hechavarria on Monday, but chose Mike McCoy instead because of Hechavarria’s commitment elsewhere to deal with citizenship-related issues. At any rate, they would not call up Hechavarria unless he had an opportunity to play every day, Farrell added.

Hechavarria defected from Cuba in 2009. In April 2010, the Blue Jays signed him to a four-year, US$10-million contract.

Defensively, he is major-league ready. He is batting .316 with a .368 on-base percentage at Las Vegas.

Article source: http://www.canada.com/sports/baseball/Hechavarria+cleared+travel+Canada/6705160/story.html

Uniglobe Member CT Business Travel Wins Award


TUNBRIDGE WELLS, England, May 31, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ –
Uniglobe member CT Business Travel is presented with a new award to add to its growing collection.

Winning awards for Tunbridge Wells based business CT Business Travel is nothing new, but that’s certainly not to say they take them for granted, as each one is earned from a continued commitment to provide outstanding corporate travel management services.

This latest award came as a complete surprise and was presented at a conference the company was attending. The conference was Uniglobe’s Global Rendezvous, and was held in Amsterdam 11th to 13th May 2012.

This bi-annual event is organised by Uniglobe Travel, where its members can attend various events including presentations by some of the industry’s leading brands covering a wide range topics such as the latest technology innovations to new product announcements. The event was held over 3 days and included a prestigious gala dinner on the Saturday evening.

The award was presented during one of the conference days and whilst CT Business Travel was aware there were awards being presented they had no idea they had been nominated for the award which they then went on to win.

Mark Kempster, Managing Director of CT Business Travel commented, “Whilst we’re not in business to win awards, it is incredibly gratifying to receive them, as it means we’re being acknowledged for our hard work. The award presented to myself was for ‘whatever it takes’, which is in recognition of the support we give to customers, colleagues and the various personnel we come into contact with to demonstrate ‘we are family’. Receiving awards like this is great for business as it shows our staff and customers the fruits of our labour and I’m incredibly grateful to receive this award”.

In total there were 350+ international members attending the conference, made up of business owners, stakeholders and senior management. There were 5 nominees in contention out of thousands that make up Uniglobe’s membership, so the award received was no easy achievement.

CT Business Travel has been trading for over 21 years and is one of the largest independent business travel agents in the UK, arranging business flights and providing travel management services to an impressive range of national and international clients.

For more information on how to become a client of CT Business Travel and the services it provides, call 01892-673-422.

Contact
Simon Colley
Absolute Internet Marketing
Telephone – +44(0)1858-419226
Email – simon@absoluteinternetmarketing.co.uk
Web –

http://www.absoluteinternetmarketing.co.uk

SOURCE CT Business Travel

Copyright (C) 2012 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

Article source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/uniglobe-member-ct-business-travel-wins-award-2012-05-31

Should Mark Zuckerberg have tipped the waiter in Rome?

The plunging price of Facebook stock aside, Mark Zuckerberg seems to have become ensnared in a kerfuffle over his apparent decision not to leave a tip on a meal during his honeymoon in Rome.

The online Telegraph newspaper reports the Facebook tycoon failed to leave a tip after spending about $40 on fried pumpkin flowers and sea bass-stuffed ravioli at Nonna Betta in the Italian capital’s historic Jewish quarter. What he ate isn’t important, but what he should have known about tipping etiquette is.

Travel outfitter Magellan’s says 10% above the service charge is appropriate throughout Italy. Conde Nast Traveler‘s tipping guide says leave as close to 10% as possible, no more than that, when in Italy. And business magazine Kiplinger suggests restaurant tips of 15% to 20% that are standard stateside would seem far too extravagant in Italy and much of Europe.

I find that my tipping etiquette — for hotel stays, bellhops, etc. — is inconsistent at best, even when I’m just tooling around the U.S. It’s kind of like eating right: We all know the guidelines for healthy eating but don’t always follow them.

So here’s a bunch of general tipping guidelines from etiquette czar Emily Post and a nifty quiz from Kiplinger that will gauge just what kind of tipper you are. And here’s Travel Editor Catharine Hamm’s advice on proper tipping for hotel bellmen.

One tip about tipping that’s a no-brainer: Include money for tipping into your vacation budget so you don’t come up short. But, thankfully, if you misstep, you likely won’t garner the media attention Zuckerberg did.

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/travel/deals/la-trb-tipping-zuckerberg-20120531,0,3706915.story

Should Mark Zuckerberg have tipped the waiter in Rome?

The plunging price of Facebook stock aside, Mark Zuckerberg seems to have become ensnared in a kerfuffle over his apparent decision not to leave a tip on a meal during his honeymoon in Rome.

The online Telegraph newspaper reports the Facebook tycoon failed to leave a tip after spending about $40 on fried pumpkin flowers and sea bass-stuffed ravioli at Nonna Betta in the Italian capital’s historic Jewish quarter. What he ate isn’t important, but what he should have known about tipping etiquette is.

Travel outfitter Magellan’s says 10% above the service charge is appropriate throughout Italy. Conde Nast Traveler‘s tipping guide says leave as close to 10% as possible, no more than that, when in Italy. And business magazine Kiplinger suggests restaurant tips of 15% to 20% that are standard stateside would seem far too extravagant in Italy and much of Europe.

I find that my tipping etiquette — for hotel stays, bellhops, etc. — is inconsistent at best, even when I’m just tooling around the U.S. It’s kind of like eating right: We all know the guidelines for healthy eating but don’t always follow them.

So here’s a bunch of general tipping guidelines from etiquette czar Emily Post and a nifty quiz from Kiplinger that will gauge just what kind of tipper you are. And here’s Travel Editor Catharine Hamm’s advice on proper tipping for hotel bellmen.

One tip about tipping that’s a no-brainer: Include money for tipping into your vacation budget so you don’t come up short. But, thankfully, if you misstep, you likely won’t garner the media attention Zuckerberg did.

Article source: http://www.latimes.com/travel/deals/la-trb-tipping-zuckerberg-20120531,0,3706915.story

When the Frommers talk travel, they may disagree

NEW YORK — She likes Venice as a side trip from Rome; he says do Florence instead. She likes traveling with kids; he says he doesn’t — even though he took her when she was young.

But the occasional difference of opinion is part of the charm when you listen to the call-in radio show hosted by an unusual father-daughter team with a famous last name: travel gurus Arthur and Pauline Frommer.

“It was quite a shock to have my daughter disagree with me the first time it happened, but the people at the station said it was great radio,” said Arthur Frommer, 83, as they prepared on a recent Sunday for “The Travel Show with Arthur and Pauline Frommer.”

“He says when we disagree, it’s like 50 years of his life mean nothing,” said Pauline, 46, with a laugh.

It was actually more than 50 years ago when the elder Frommer self-published his first guidebook, “Europe on 5 Dollars a Day” in 1957, using material he gathered while stationed in Germany with the U.S. Army. That book launched a guidebook company that has become one of the world’s most recognized travel brands. Pauline is carrying on the family tradition with her own line of guidebooks and as founding editor of Frommers.com.

They also bring their travel expertise to the air each Sunday, broadcasting live from WOR-AM studios in New York beginning at noon. The show is carried on 115 stations, reaching every state but Alaska. There’s hardly a place in the world they haven’t been, and their off-the-cuff knowledge is astounding as they effortlessly field callers asking about everything from what to do in Denmark to the best outfitters for African safaris.

Only rarely does a question stump them (“Jewish sites in Morocco? I haven’t a clue!” says Pauline during a commercial break), and any questions they don’t have time for — including those sent in by email or Twitter — Pauline emails back during the week.

Father-daughter chemistry is what makes the show so much fun to listen to. Sometimes they both chime in to answer; other times, they divide the topics based on their experiences. Arthur took a question about river cruises in Austria and Germany, while Pauline spoke from experience about RV road trips. An email query on visiting concentration camps in Europe was shared: “You know how to go to Auschwitz,” said Arthur, “I know how to go to Dachau.”

It’s a testament to their reputation that travelers still look to them when so much is available online. Pauline says they offer clarity amid the information overload; Arthur says “people have learned to trust our judgment because we have no commercial interests to push.” Pauline adds that the occasional disagreements bolster their credibility: “It shows we’re not in anyone’s pay.”

The friction also adds to the fun. “People tell us it reminds them of their relationships with their fathers,” Pauline says. “We hear that from a lot of people who work in family businesses.”

When a caller who hates crowds asks if Versailles is worth it, Pauline says it’s “insanely crowded,” has a “big problem with pickpockets” and suggests the palace at Fontainebleau instead. Then Arthur jumps in: “Pauline, I couldn’t disagree with you more!”

A call about Venice versus Florence results in a similar divergence: “I prefer Venice,” says Pauline, followed by Arthur: “Venice is impossible in the summer months — it’s like Times Square!”

“I’m sorry,” Pauline says to the caller, “you’ve sparked an argument between the Frommers.”

Off the air, she says their “biggest arguments are about whether to travel with children.” She loves taking her two young daughters to other parts of the world, even if that means going to the park instead of a museum. “That time spent in playgrounds with the kids is magical,” she says. “You meet other parents, find the best restaurants. Besides, if you want to travel, what other choice do parents have aside from taking their kids?”

Arthur’s take on travel with children is more succinct: “I feel it destroys the trip.” Still, he recalls taking Pauline on her first voyage, with her mother Hope, in 1965 when she was 4 months old, leading to a family joke that the original guidebooks should have been called “Europe on Five Diapers a Day” instead of dollars.

Chitchat before the show includes not just going over the program but also catching up on family news. Pauline mentions her husband’s upcoming bike race and asks what the doctor said about her dad’s cough; he mentions a trip he’s planning to England to take a course on Virginia Woolf at Oxford, and prompts her to retell a story about ziplining with her family in Belize.

Then the show begins. They start with a script they’ve prepared with recent travel news — this week, how the debt crisis in Greece is affecting tourism and the dramatic drop in prices for Mediterranean cruises. Arthur occasionally rails against things that pique his ire — a $100 baggage fee on Spirit Airlines, the construction of a “phony port city” in the Dominican Republic that he says will line the cruise company’s coffers while keeping visitors from ever having “any contact with a real person.”

Next, they go to the phone lines, with a few questions coming by email or Twitter. The show’s second hour is carried by some but not all stations, and they usually host an interview or two as well, with experts on subjects ranging from medical tourism to wine trails. Any questions they don’t get to, Pauline responds in writing later.

Pauline says she’s always been close to her dad — she’s an only child — “but working like this added a new depth and respect to our relationship. It’s not always smooth, our working relationship, but it’s deeply satisfying in a way that is hard to put words to. And it’s wonderful to have a working partner whose mind is a steel trap, and who doesn’t just have smarts, but wisdom.”

She also says they’re in complete agreement on the philosophy that made Arthur’s original books so famous: “We’ve always been proudly low-budget.”

Back on the show, Mary from Queens is calling in to ask for a tour group recommendation for her 30-year-old daughter, who’s going to Italy for the first time. Pauline tries to talk her out of a tour, noting that she’ll see a lot more and meet more locals if she’s not confined to a bus filled with tourists.

As Pauline talks, Arthur nods. “For once,” he says, “I agree with you!”

___

THE TRAVEL TALK SHOW WITH ARTHUR AND PAULINE FROMMER: http://www.wor710.com/pages/10606518.php. Airs every Sunday at noon Eastern time from WOR-AM radio in New York, carried on 115 radio stations across the country. Live questions can be called in to 800-544-7070 or email Frommertravelshow(at)yahoo.com

—Copyright 2012 Associated Press

Article source: http://online.wsj.com/article/AP30ace6b918a049fda0527ad15c08a077.html